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Department News & Congratulations


  • Rebekah Spera successfully defended her dissertation, titled “The Speculative Philosophy of History and Normativity: Habermas' Middle Period,” on July 17th, 2020. Dr. John Lysaker directed the dissertation. Committee members were Professors Noëlle McAfee and Michael Sullivan. Professors Rocío Zambrana and Eduardo Mendieta were readers.

     
  • Professor Dilek Huseyinzadegan's article on Kant's political philosophy was highlighted in a virtual special issue of Kantian Review, entitled, Kantian Thinking in a Time of Crisis. Huseyinzadegan's article is among the six previously published pieces that the Editors curated to demonstrate the continued relevance of Kantian thinking for our times. Read her essay and re-framing as well as the Editors' Introduction for free, here.

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A Message from the Faculty

Dear students,

We want to express our awareness of the gravity of the ongoing situation and the racist history that has led to it. Anti-black racism must cease. Black folk must be safe from murder at the hands of police officers. The United States can no longer refuse full citizenship and cultural standing to those, without whom, the United States would not exist. And we must strive to live in concrete acknowledgment of how, against all odds, black folk, at every level, have enriched the myriad possibilities available to those who live, work, and love here.

We also want to let you know that we are committed to cultivating a community that helps each other and shows solidarity in moments of crisis. In the thick of this situation, no one should be alone. Please reach out to one another and know that your faculty is available to talk about whatever issues and concerns are filling your thoughts, whether they pertain to the department, its curriculum and programs, Emory, life in Atlanta, or the broader landscape of philosophy as a profession and a history. We are here, and not just to talk with you, but to learn with and from you.

Looking ahead, we remain committed to building a home for faculty who work in the face of daily, anti-black racism, and to continue to attract leading scholars whose work addresses these issues. Growing such a faculty is an immediate and long-term goal. Moreover, even in a time of frozen budgets, we will intensify our support for our chapter of Minorities and Philosophy, and help it move from a joint graduate and undergraduate organization to two organizations, each with their own mission. 

Anti-black racism must cease. Black folk must be safe from murder at the hands of police officers. The United States can no longer refuse full citizenship and cultural standing to those, without whom, the United States would not exist. And we must strive to live in concrete acknowledgment of how, against all odds, black folk, at every level, have enriched the myriad possibilities available to those who live, work, and love here.

The Faculty of Emory University's Department of Philosophy

Announcements

 

Fall 2020

Please Welcome Our New Faculty Member, Axelle Karera

Axelle Karera received her PhD in philosophy from Penn State University. Prior to joining Emory University, she was assistant professor of philosophy and African American studies at Wesleyan University. Karera works and teaches at the intersection of 20th century continental philosophy, the critical philosophy of race (particularly Black critical theory), contemporary critical theory, and the environmental humanities. In addition to a project on Blackness and ontology, as well as a forthcoming paper on Blackness and hospitality for the journal Diacritics, she is currently completing her first monograph titled The Climate of Race: Blackness and the Pitfalls of Anthropocene Ethics. In the book, Karera turns to the question of relationality in new materialist ontology and speculative realism's purported return to metaphysics. More importantly, the book's investigations attempt to discern the ethical core of critical thought in the age of the Anthropocene, with the aim to attend to its powerful - and perhaps even necessary - disavowals on matters pertaining to racial ecocide.