Graduate Student Courses

This section is intended to provide useful information for current graduate students in the Emory Philosophy Department, though anyone is welcome to browse.

Fall 2017 Courses

PHIL 501R - Topic: Plato and Aristotle
Jimenez, Tue 1:00PM - 4:00PM, Bowden Hall

Content:
The course's main topic is “Plato and Aristotle on Democracy and Tyranny”. We will explore the conceptions of democracy and tyranny in Plato and Aristotle, and deal with questions about freedom, subjection, and power as they appear in their work. 
 
Some of the questions and issues that we will be exploring are: 1. What is democracy? Who is the "demos" in democracy? 2. The problem of rhetoric and subjection through persuasion. 3. The weight of the law in democracy. 4. Authority and pedagogy. Can virtue be taught? Should virtue be taught? Should authority be used to inculcate certain interests in others? Should all interests be promoted equally? 5. Pleasure, money and debauchery. Why did Plato associate the democratic character with pleasure-seeking behavior? What is so wrong about loving money?  6. What is oligarchy? Is oligarchy better or worse than democracy? 7. What is freedom? Why does Plato seem to think that the freedom characteristic of democracy is ruinous? 8. What is subjection? (The subjection of women, slaves and manual laborers.) 9. What is tyranny? Does democracy necessarily lead to tyranny? 10. The tyrant as model of wretched life.
 
The main texts will include not only the explicit discussions of these topics in Plato's Republic and Laws, and in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Eudemian Ethics and Politics, but also Plato's CritoGorgias, Protagoras, and Statesman, and Aristotle's Rhetoric.and Constitution of Athens. We will also read some selections from texts by other relevant ancient authors such as Antiphon, Thucydides, Democritus, and Isocrates.
 
To help with our analysis we will draw upon contemporary discussions of democracy and tyranny, freedom and oppresion in ancient thought. Scholars to be canvassed will include Giorgio Agamben, Danielle Allen, Julia Annas, Hanna Arendt, Alain Badiou, Étienne Balibar, Ryan Ballot, Isaiah Berlin, Wendy Brown, John Cooper, Michel Foucault, Jill Frank, Zena Hitz, Kazutaka Inamura, Terence Irwin, Rachana Kamtekar, Richard Kraut, Mitzi Lee, Fred Miller, Martha Nussbaum, Josiah Ober, Adriel Trott, and Bernard Williams.

Text:
- Plato. Complete Works (ed. John M. Cooper & D. S. Hutchinson, Hackett 1997).
Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation, vol. 2 (ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press 1984).
- Additional required readings will be available for download through the course website.
 

PHIL 525R - Topic: The Origin of Modern Political Philosophy in 17th Century
Goldenbaum, Mon 6:00PM-9PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content:
What are individual rights? Who grants such rights? Who are the people? What makes a state? What or who is a sovereign? Is there a duty of obedience? What is justice? Is there a social contract and if so, who contracts? All these questions appear to be contemporary problems and are hotly discussed today. Most of them have first been raised in the 17th century when traditional political and religious structures had fallen apart during religious civil wars after the Reformation; what had appeared natural and God-given for more than thousand years became obsolete. The solid while challenging answers given to these questions by Thomas Hobbes, Spinoza, John Locke, and G.W. Leibniz are still vibrant in today’s political discussion.

Text:
- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan
Recommended: Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, ed. by Ed Curley, Hackett
- Spinoza, A Theological-Political Treatise
Recommended: Spinoza, The Collected Works of Spinoza, vol. 2, ed. and trans. by Ed Curley, Princeton UP: Princeton 2016.
- Locke, Two Treatises On Government, 2nd Treatise
Recommended: Any Edition by Peter Laslett.
- Leibniz, On Justice and Law
Recommended: Leibniz, Political Writings, ed. by Patrick Riley, Cambridge UP: Cambridge 1988 and more often.

Particulars:
Grades will be based on your in-class performance, one 15-minutes presentation in class, and one final paper at the end of semester (about 20pp.), on a systematic topic of the seminar.

PHIL 531R - Emerson & Thoreau
Lysaker, Wed 6:00PM - 9:00PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content: Emerson and Thoreau braid the philosophy of nature with an approach to the good life that aspires to a certain kind of cosmopolitanism, one that impacts how each conceives of and enacts the project of writing. While these are not the only salient themes in their respective thought and writings, they are principal ones, and thus the course will also serve as an introduction to their thought.

The course will be split evenly between the two thinkers. From Emerson, we will read Nature, "American Scholar" & "Divinity School Address," "Self-Reliance," "Experience," "Method of Nature" & "Nature," "Fate" and "Race," and "Power." Walden will focus our exploration of Thoreau, though we also will read "Walking."

Text: Emerson: Essays and Lectures: (Library of America) 0940450151

Walden, Civil Disobedience, and Other Writings (Norton Critical Editions), 3rd Edition. 0393930904

Particulars: Attendance and participation required. Students must also write weekly short papers and a term paper with an annotated bibliography.

PHIL 540R-1 - 20th Cent. Philosophy Seminar
Flynn, Tue 6:00PM - 9:00PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content: This is a seminar rather than a lecture course, though I shall contribute introductory reflections about the respective contributions of each author to the topics presented along the way. Depending on the size of our group, each seminarist will be expected to present online in advance and defend in class a five-page essay on each of the two topics taken from our list. A final essay of ten to fifteen pages, reflecting your views on a topic generated from our discussions will be presented at the conclusion of the course. Though Aristotle warns against seeking quantitative certitude in “moral” matters, the shorter essays will each count for 20% of the grade, the final for 50% and participation online and in class for 10%.

The material will probably be 40% Sartre and 60% Foucault since I directed a seminar on Sartre last Fall. Seminarists are encouraged to discuss this lay-out of topics and manner of grading.

Text:

  • The Self versus the Ego
  • Methodology (Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Structuralism and Dialectic)
  • History (with a Hegelian “H”),
  • Freud and the unconscious or lack thereof,
  • Authenticity and Parrhesia as ingredient in a paradoxical ethics and politics.

Particulars: The texts will consist of two or three shorter books by each philosopher as well as online material. I shall place several helpful or required texts on reserve for common use, though you may wish to buy relevant texts for your personal library. I would suggest that each of you read the entries on “Foucault” and “Sartre” on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) in preparation for our initial meeting.

PHIL 556R - Phenomenology: and Race
Yancy, Wed 2:00PM - 5:00PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content: What is a phenomenology of race? What does it entail?  Part of our objective in this course is to clarify these two questions. In fact, as we examine the philosophical literature that engages race from a phenomenological perspective, we will keep those two questions before us. Addressing those questions are partly what we will continue to do within this course. So, we will develop a workable definition of a phenomenology of race by precisely engaging some of the literature that deploys phenomenological concepts to address the issue of race. Phenomenological engagements with the theme of race are still relatively new. There is only one single authored book exclusively on race and phenomenology. There are, however, various articles and chapters dedicated to the subject. Part of our aim is to think about how various phenomenological assumptions (our lived experience, our life-world, our embodiment, our sociality, and our movement through space) help us to grapple with the concept of race. We will also explore if phenomenological investigations of race offer important ways to address the problem of race, which, for us, is primarily the question of racism. Within this context, we will specifically draw from phenomenological engagements with the question of racialized embodiment and perception.

Text: George Yancy's Black Bodies White Gazes (second edition).
Shannon Sullivan's Revealing Whiteness.  
There will also be chapters and articles which will be made available.

Particulars: There will also be chapters and articles which will be made available.


PHIL 599R - Thesis Research
Mitchell, TBA 

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 700 - Research Methods, Teaching, Philosophy & Professional Development  
Lysaker, Th 10:00AM - 11:15AM, Bowden Hall 216

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 777 - Philosophy And Pedagogy  
Mitchell, Wed 11:30AM - 12:45PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 789 - Topic: Critical Legal Studies & Theory
Sullivan, Th 1:00PM - 4:00PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content: The Philosophical study of law has long focused on the relation of theory to practice, and the connection between juridical legitimacy and social power.  In particular, there has been a great deal of effort to distinguish legitimate from illegitimate grounds of judicial decision making.   In this seminar, we will explore the effects of this on-going battle.  In particular, we will look at the efforts of critical legal studies to draw upon resources in political economy and deconstruction to expose tensions and contradictions in the official characterizations of American Law offered by traditional theories, and in particular to debunk appeals to neutral principle. Subsequently, we will look at more recent efforts from both the right and left side of the political aisle to bring accomplishments in social science and contributions to normative critique consciously informed by considerations of race and gender to bear upon judicial decision making.  In particular, we will consider work in law & economics, legal feminism, and critical race theory.  We will explore this material in relation to landmark Supreme Court Cases like Brownand Roe, more recent cases such as Hobby Lobby and Obergefell, and with respect to future jurisprudence.   The goal is to consider how, and in what way, such theoretical work can, does, or should impact the practice of judicial decision making, particularly in Constitutional Cases.

Text:

  • Crenshaw, Critical Race Theory
  • Delgado, Intro to Critical Race Theory
  • Posner, Problems of Jurisprudence
  • Derrida, Before the Law
  • Fineman, The Autonomy Myth
  • Balkin, Cultural Software
  • Dworkin, Taking Rights Seriously
  • Kennedy, A Criqitue of Adjudication
  • MacKinnon, Feminism Unmodified
  • Williams, Alchemy of Race & Rights
  • Various Supreme Court Cases

Particulars: Short papers, seminar participation and presentation, and term paper.

 

PHIL 789 - Topic: Psychoanalysis/Cont.Pol.Phil.  
McAfee, Mon 2:00PM - 5:00PM, Bowden Hall 216

Content

Taking up the “political unconscious,” this seminar will focus first on Freud’s most relevant texts and then move into trajectories of psychoanalysis since Freud and the various ways that psychoanalytic theory has been deployed in 20th century and contemporary social and political thought.

Tentatively, we will proceed as follows:

  • two weeks on key Freudian texts such as “the unconscious,” “on narcissism,” “mourning and melancholoia,” “group psychology,” “beyond the pleasure principle” and excerpts from late texts such as Civilization and Its Discontents
  • two weeks on post-Freud psychoanalytic schools, e.g. ego psychology, British object relations theory, relational schools, with special attention to the work of Klein, Fairborn, and Winnicott
  • two weeks on the uses of psychoanalytic theory in three generations of the Frankfurt School
  • two weeks on Lacan, Althusser, and Zizek on the imaginary, the mirror stage, ideology, and the symbolic
  • one week on race and ethnicity, via the work of Fanon and Volkan
  • one week on sexuality contra Lacan, via Irigaray and Cixous
  • one week on Andrë Green and Kristeva on the French reception of Freudian object-relations theory
  • one week on Deleuze & Guattari and maybe also Lyotard on desire and politics
  • one week on Castoriadis and the radical imaginary (plus Drucilla Cornell on autonomy reimagined)
  • one week on Laplanche’s social psychoanalytic theory
  • final week wrap up: politics and the fear of breakdown

Students will likely be called on to give frequent presentations overviewing the readings plus they will, of course, write a final seminar paper.

Text: TBA

Particulars: Students will likely be called on to give frequent presentations overviewing the readings plus they will, of course, write a final seminar paper.

PHIL 797R - Directed Study 
Mitchell, 

PHIL 799R - Directed Study 
Mitchell, 

Spring 2017 Courses

Phil: 500R-000 Topic: Aristotle on Justice: Ancient Philosophy Seminar
Jimenez, Wed 2:00-5:00pm, Bowden Hall 216

Content:
The main goal of this seminar is to examine the political, ethical and psychological dimensions of Aristotle’s theory of justice. Many aspects of Aristotle’s discussion of justice in his ethical and political treatises have been a source of inspiration for modern authors. The notion of justice as equality, the distinction between distributive and corrective justice, and the concept of equity are only a few examples of Aristotelian contributions to contemporary thought. However, some aspects of his notion of justice have also been a source of puzzlement. Concretely, in the past decades commentators have argued that his notion of justice as a personal virtue is incoherent, and that his conception of justice as lawfulness (or general justice) may be abandoned in preference for his views on the narrower forms of justice—namely distributive, corrective and reciprocal justice, which relate a person to another according to a conception of equality or fairness. In this course we will explore both the admired and the reviled aspects of Aristotle’s theory of justice with the goal of assessing them in the context of the Aristotelian system and as potentially fruitful paths to think about justice today.
 
Our main texts will be Aristotle’s Politics and Nicomachean Ethics, but we will also read substantial sections from Plato’s Republic, Protagoras and Gorgias, and from Aristotle’s Rhetoric, De Anima, Categories and Physics. Some of the topics of discussion will be: “Aristotle’s Criticism of Plato’s Republic”; “Aristotle (and Plato) on Greed as the Origin of Injustice”; “Aristotle’s Two Justices in NE V: The Limits of Modern Equality”; “Political Friendship and Justice in Aristotle (and Plato)”; “Self-Love, Other-Relatedness and Justice as a Personal Virtue”; “The Good Citizen and the Virtuous Person”; “Is Righteous Indignation (Nemesis) a Kind of Proto-Justice?”; “Justice, Anger and Revolution in Aristotle’s Politics”.
 
To help with our analysis we will draw upon contemporary discussions of justice in Aristotle. Scholars to be canvassed will include Danielle Allen, Julia Annas, Ryan Ballot, John Cooper, Howard Curzer, Kazutaka Inamura, Terence Irwin, Richard Kraut, Mi-Kyoung (Mitzi) Lee, Fred Miller, Martha Nussbaum, Jennifer Whiting, Bernard Williams and Chris Young.

Text:
- Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation, vol. 2 (ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press 1984).
- Additional required readings will be available for download through the course website.

Particulars:

PHIL 525 - Topics in Modern Philosophy
Bennington, Th 1:00PM - 4:00PM, Callaway Center N106

Topic:
Rousseau

Content:
Text:
Particulars:

Phil: Course 531R: Hegel’s Phenomenology
Verene and Branham, Tues. 2:00-5:00pm, MAX: 18

Content:
A section-by-section reading of the complete text of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Attention to parts of other works correlated with parts of the Phenomenology: the early fragments, esp. concerning the “mythology of reason,” the Jena system, the “true infinity” and mathematical infinite in the Science of Logic, criticism of deontological ethics in the Philosophy of Right, and the origin of the Absolute in the Cusanian conception of maximum absolutum.

Text:
Required:
G. W. F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. A. V. Miller. Oxford. ISBN 978-0-19-824597-1
D. P. Verene, Hegel’s Absolute: An Introduction to Reading the Phenomenology of Spirit. SUNY Press. ISBN 978-0-79146964-4
Recommended:
D. P. Verene, Hegel’s Recollection: A Study of Images in the Phenomenology of Spirit. SUNY Press. ISBN 0-88706-012-9 

Particulars:
Requirement: final seminar paper (15 pp.)

PHIL 551R - Topics in Contemporary Philosophy
Willett, Mo 2:00PM - 5:00PM, Bowden Hall 216

Topics:
Include sensations, sensations, emotions, catharsis, address, and neoliberalism.

Content:
Questions of the seminar emerge at the edge between contemporary aesthetics and politics beginning with the 1990s emergence of affect theory, relational ethics, relational aesthetics, and posthumanism.
 
Text:
Authors include Butler’s Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, Donna Haraway’s Staying with the Trouble, Paul Taylor’s Black Aesthetics, Sara Ahmed’s Cultural Politics of Emotion, as well as readings from Fred Moten, Elizabeth Grosz, Richard Kearney, Suely Rolnick, and Robin James and Rene Loraine and Suzanne Langer on music among others.

Particulars:
Two presentations and a term paper


PHIL 570R-000: Ethics: Accounting for Ourselves
Lysaker – Thursday – 1:00PM – 4:00PM

Content:
From a stage initially set by Aristotle, Beauvoir, and Adorno, which will explore the following: How and why do we account for ourselves? What praise/blame criteria apply to such accounts? In what way, and to what degree, is accounting for oneself integral to an ethical life?

Texts:
J. Butler, Precarious Life; J. Butler, Giving an Account of Oneself; J. Habermas, Moral Consciousness & Communicative Action; S. Cavell, Conditions Handsome & Unhandsome (and a few other bits and bobs).

Particulars:
Term paper; weekly 1-page reflections

PHIL 599R - Thesis Research
Willett, TBA,

PHIL 789 - Topics In Philosophy
Gilman, Goodstein, Tu 1:00PM-4:00PM, Bowden Hall 323

Topic:
Against Culture/For Education

Content:
Text:
Particulars:

Note:
This is a combined section class

PHIL 789 - Topics In Philosophy
Judovitz, Tu 1:00PM-4:00PM, Callaway Center C202

Topic: Theories of Subjectivity
Content:
Text:
Particulars:

Note:
This is a combined section class

PHIL 789-00P Habituation and Human Development
Bredlau, We 6:00PM-9:00PM, 216 Bowden Hall

Content:
In this course, we will focus on the role that habituation, along with language and artistic expression, plays in developing our capacities for political and ethical engagement with others. We will begin by reading selections from Dewey's Democracy and Education, Human Nature and Conduct, and Art as Experience. Dewey emphasizes the fundamental role that education plays in human experience, and we will explore his conception of education and its implications for the arts and the practice of democracy. Next, we will turn to Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception to study the embodied character of our experience and the demands that our intimate relations with others place on us. We will conclude by reading Merleau-Ponty's "The Child's Relations with Others."

Text:
Democracy and Education, Dewey
Human Nature and Conduct, Dewey
Art as Experience, Dewey
Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty
Primacy of Perception, Merleau-Ponty

Particulars:
Assignments will include short explication papers and a term paper.

PHIL 797R - Direct Study
Willett, TBA

PHIL 799R - Advanced Research
Willett, TBA

Fall 2016 Courses

PHIL 524R-000 - Modern Philosophy Seminar
Goldenbaum, Tues, 2-5pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: While many know of Voltaire’s Candide, making fun of Leibniz who took our world to be the best possible, few are capable to judge this controversy -- due to the notorious difficulty of Leibniz’s metaphysics. His windowless monads are hard to digest. They provide, however, a sophisticated solution of the mind-body problem which has not been overuled by any recent theory. There is hardly any area of knowledge Leibniz did not make discoveries and inventions, not to mention that he knew more about then-current European and Asian politics than any of his contemporaries. We will cover major areas of Leibniz’s philosophical engagement, his metaphysics, epistemology, social philosophy and philosophy of law, with his theory of justice in its center.

Text: The required texts can be seen from the reading assignments in the schedule. Almost all texts are included in the following recommended edition:

-Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Philosopical Papers and Letters, trans. and ed. by Leroy E. Loemker, Dordrecht: Reidel 1969 (and later editions) (Notice: Loemker was the first chair of our department!)

Alternatively, you can use other English editions, including those on the internet, are permitted. You will be responsible to adapt to the page numbers though and to get access to those texts that are included in the Loemker Edition only.

Recommended: Roger Ariew/Daniel Garber, Philosophical Essays, Hackett 1999 and more often (about $20).

In addition, we will read Leibniz’s New Essays and his Theodicy in the following editions that can also be read online:

- P. Remnant & Jonathan Bennett, New Essays on Human Understanding, Cambridge UP 1996.

- Huggard, E.M., Theodicy, 1952 and more often.

Particulars: One seminar paper of 20 pages, one short presentation on small topics in class.

PHIL 541R-000 - Topics in 20th Century Philosophy
Flynn, Mon, 2-5pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 551R-000 - Topics in Contemporary Philosophy
Yancy, Wed, 6-9pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 554 - The Frankfurt School and its Contemporary Critics (Same as POLS 585)

Buchenhorst, Wed, 2-5pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: The seminar aims at analyzing and discussing the main characteristics of the so called Critical Theory, an approach to modern social constellations first institutionalized with the foundation of the Institute for Social Research in Frankfurt and continuing its academic and intellectual activities into its third generation. Additionally, the course attempts to follow both the historical and the contemporary reception of the philosophical, sociological and aesthetic implementations of the Frankfurt School. Some of the central texts of its authors will be read and contextualized by confronting them with some of their most pronounced critics.

The course consists of four blocks, following the chronological order of the theories historical development: first block: the pre-war period, second block: the post-war period and the second generation, third block: contemporary critical theory, forth block: critical reception of the Frankfurt School.

Text

-       Adorno, Theodor W, Essays on Music, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press 2002.

-       Benhabib, Seyla 2002, The Claims of Culture. Equality and Diversity in the Global Era, Princeton: Princeton University Press.

-       Benjamin, Walter., Illuminations: Essays and Reflections, New York: Schocken 2007.

-       Buck-Morss, Susan: The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project, Cambrigde/Mass.: MIT Press 1989.

-       Butler, Judith/Habermas, Juergen et al., The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere, New York: Columbia University Press 2011.

-       Habermas, Juergen: A Berlin Republic: Writings on Germany, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press 1997.

-       Honneth, Axel., The Struggle for Recognition: The Moral Grammar of Social Conflicts, Cambridge: Polity Press 1995.

-       Horkheimer, Max/Adorno, Th.W.: Dialectic of Enlightenment: Philosophical Fragments, Stanford: Stanford University Press 2002.

-       Jaeggi, Rahel: Alienation. Part 1. The Relation of Relationlessness: Reconstructing a Concept of Social Philosophy, New York: Columbia University Press 2014.

-       Jameson, Fredric, A Singular Modernity. London/New York 2012.

-       Jay, Martin: Refractions of Violence, New York/Abingdon 2003.

-       Maurizio Passerin D’Entrevez/Seyla Benhabib (eds.): Habermas and the Unfinished Project of Modernity, Cambridge: Polity Press 1996.

-       Rorty, Richard, Contingeny, Irony, and Solidarity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1989.

-       Wheatland, Thomas., The Frankfurt School in Exile, Minneapolis/London: University of Minneapolis Press 2009.

-       Wiggershaus, Rolf, The Frankfurt School: Its History, Theories, and Political Significance, Cambridge/Mass.: MIT Press 1995.

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 558R-000 - Pragmatism
Sullivan, Tues, 1-4pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 700-000 - Research Methods, Teaching, Philosophy & Professional Development
Lysaker, Tues, 11:30am-12:45pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: This seminar is intended for and required of all philosophy Ph.D. students in their first year of study at Emory University. The course seeks to provide students with an opportunity to: reflect on and develop academic research, analysis, interpretation, application, reading, and writing skills; plan a successful personal program of graduate study, professional placement, and professional advancement, and become able to draw on financial and other professional resources necessary for this; and critically consider philosophies of teaching and their implications for multiple aspects and styles of successful teaching in the discipline of philosophy. The course will draw on brief contemporary readings, presentations by many Emory philosophy professors as coordinated by the course’s instructor, and the resources of the Woodruff Library, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, and related Centers and Institutes at Emory, as well as the American Philosophical Association.

Format: This course will function as a seminar. Most class meetings will include both informal presentations and substantial discussion. Students are expected to participate actively and fully in all class meetings.

Text: Contemporary articles and chapters from books will be distributed electronically, from texts that include: H. Bedau’s Thinking and Writing About Philosophy (2nd ed.); The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career; William Germano, Getting it Published; Chicago Handbook for Teachers; Lawrence, Philosopy of Education.

Particulars: Preparation for, attendance at, and active participation in every seminar meeting. Completion of several brief writing assignments.

In 2009, this course is required of and open only to first and second year students in the department of philosophy Ph.D. program

PHIL 777-000 - Philosopy And Pedagogy
Lysaker, Thur, 11:30am-12:45pm - Bowden Hall 216

Content: This is the department’s TATTO course, and it aims to develop the teaching abilities of graduate students as they begin serving as teaching assistants, co-teachers, and then teachers.  This course is required of and open only to second year graduate students in the department of philosophy’s Ph.D. program. 

Text: TBA

Particulars: Students are required to attend all class sessions, complete required reading and short writing assignments, and participate in teaching development activities.

PHIL 797R-00P - Directed Study
TBA, Tues, 1-4pm - TBA

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 799R-000 - Advanced Research
Willett, TBA - TBA

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

Spring 2016 Courses

PHIL 552R-000 - Analytic Philosophy
Fotion, Mon, 2-5pm Max:

Content:
This seminar will survey Anglo-American Philosophy (aka Analytic Philosophy) from the beginning of the 20th into the 21st century.  The seminar will focus on three areas.  1.  Philosophy of Language.  One of the questions we will deal with is: What basically different view of language did the Oxford (or Ordinary Language) School  have from that of the earlier Logical Positivists?  2.  Philosophy of Mind.   Now one of the main questions we will try to answer is: Do later analytic philosophers view the status of mental concepts not simply in behavioristic ways?  Do they now reduce mental concepts to those having to do with the brain?  Or do they insist that mental concepts are inherently subjective?  3.  Philosophy of Ethics and Social Structure.  One of the questions here is: Does analytic philosophy ever recover from the stance it took that ethical judgments are “emotive” in nature?

Text:
AP Martinich & David Sosa, eds. Analytic Philosophy: An Anthology,  2nd edition, Wiley­-­Blackwell. 2012. ISBN: 9789400722590 (paperback)

J. L. Austin, How To Do Things With Words, (Harvard UP), 1975, Harvard, ISBN: 9780674411524

J Searle, Philosophy in a New Century, (Cambridge,) 2008. ISBN: 9780521731584 (paperback)

Particulars: Students will be asked to take three tests; and write a series of short papers.


PHIL 556R-000 - Phenomenology
Bredlau, Wed, 6-9pm                                                     

Content:
Phenomenological philosophers argue that our understanding of ourselves and our world must be grounded in the careful description of our experience. In this course, we will focus on the relation between perceptual experience and knowledge. We will begin by reading Plato’s Theaetetus and consider whether the ways we usually think about our experience are, in fact, adequate to this experience. Next, we will read sections of Husserl’s Ideas I in which Husserl argues that it is flow of experience – rather than the objects of experience – that is absolute. We will then read Part Two of Merelau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception in which Merleau-Ponty works out the implications of Husserl’s insight for our understanding of sensation, space, objects, and other people. We will conclude with Derrida’s “Signature, Event, Context” and, possibly, Speech and Phenomena.

Text: 
Theaetetus, Plato

Ideas I, Edmund Husserl

Phenomenology of Perception, Maurice Merleau-Ponty

Limited Inc, Jacques Derrida

Particulars:  Assignments will include several short explication papers, class presentations and a final term paper.

PHIL 571R - Political Philosophy Seminar
Stuhr, Mon, 6-9 pm                                      

Content:
This course examines (in the first half of the term) the historical development and meaning of liberalism and critically engages and assesses (in the second half of the term) multiple traditions and lines of thought that seek to revise or reject liberalism and its views of human nature and society, liberty and equality, morality and agency, government and power, and democracy and pluralism. 
This course first seeks to provide an historically informed understanding of liberalism through engagement with several of its principal authors and texts.  While the focus will be on liberalism as a social and political philosophy, the course will also cover deep connections between liberal political theory and metaphysics (particularly views of human nature), epistemology (particularly views about the truth, the nature of reason, and knowledge of values), and ethics (particularly the moral basis of political institutions and practices).  Second, the course considers several very different historically important critical challenges to liberalism in politics and in philosophy.  Finally, the course aims to address the question:  What, if anything, is living and important in liberalism for contemporary social thought and practice.  

Format:
As a graduate seminar, students are required to prepare for, attend, and participate in all class meetings.  Most class sessions will include an informal presentation by the instructor, a focus on one or more particular central passage or passages in the assigned reading, and a critical discussion motivated by a student’s brief critical paper in response framed by the central issues in the assigned readings.

Text:
The following books are required and will be available in the University bookstore (and through many other outlets):  John Locke, Second Treatise of Government* and A Letter Concerning Toleration*; Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments*; Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and other essays on politics, history, and morals; John Stuart Mill, On Liberty*; John Dewey, Liberalism and Social Action* and The Public and Its Problems*; John Rawls, Political Liberalism and John Rawls, The Laws of Peoples; Karl Marx, Selected Writings*; Walter Lippmann, The Phantom Public; Carl Schmitt, The Concept of the Political; Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents*; Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth*; Iris Marion Young, Inclusion and Democracy; Wendy Brown Undoing the Demos+; Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century+; and Chantal Mouffe, The Democratic Paradox.  Some additional short required reading will be made available electronically—primarily via the course Blackboard site.

Note:  * = Past Masters e-text (Woodruff Library) or other full e-text available free;

            + = Available through course blackboard site

Requirements:      

1. Preparation for, attendance at, and participation in all class sessions.  (This is a requirement to pass the course.)

2. Two critical paper/in-class presentation.  These 2-3pp critical papers (one on liberalism, one on a critic) should respond critically to a central issue in the assigned readings; the papers should contain almost no expository or summary material; papers should be distributed electronically to all seminar members 48 hours (i.e., usually 1pm Tuesdays) before the relevant class meeting.  The author of this paper on a given day should play a lead roles in the ensuing discussion.

3. Final paper(s).  Students may choose to write either a single long (e.g., 20pp) paper or two shorter (12pp) paper.  (Note that this second options allows graduate students in philosophy the possibility of writing two comprehensive portfolio papers rather than only one long paper.)  These papers should address a topic centrally related to course issues, readings, and discussions, and must be chosen in consultation with the instructor.  The topic, along with a proposal that includes short outline and initial bibliography must be submitted to, and discussed with, the instructor no later than 31 March, and must receive instructor approval no later than 7 April.  (Students who choose to write two shorter papers may choose to adjust these dates earlier for the first paper.)  These papers should aim at standards and quality suitable for, and comparable to, journal publication.  The paper(s) is (are) due (electronically) by 4:00p.m Monday 5 May. 

Students must prepare for, attend, and participate in all class sessions in order to pass this seminar.  Final grades are based on the critical paper and its in-class presentation (20% of the final grade), seminar participation (20% of final grade) and final paper(s) (60% of final grade).           


PHIL 588-000 - Symbolic Logic
Risjord, MWF, 1-5pm                                                                   

Content:
This course has three goals.  First, it will introduce the techniques of contemporary symbolic logic.  We will study methods of proof and formal semantic analysis.  While the course does not presuppose prior acquaintance with symbolic logic, we will move quickly.  Students who are completely unfamiliar with symbolic logic can expect a challenge.  Second, the course will introduce the meta-theory of contemporary logic.  We will learn how to reason about logic and study some of the most important meta-theorems.  Finally, the course will provide a brief glimpse beyond the limitations of first-order logic.  Kant wrote that logic appears as a "closed and completed body of doctrine."  The last 50 years have seen a proliferation of formal systems, including logics of time, modality, and obligation.  Logicians have explored multiple truth values, higher order quantification, and relevance.  Logic can no longer appear closed or complete.  Its condition is postmodern.  At the end of the course, we will briefly sample some of these extensions and non-classical approaches to logic.

Text:
Nolt, John.  Logics.  Wadsworth, 1997  (Note: while the textbook comes with a floppy disk, we will not be using it in this class.)

Particulars: Short homework assignments for each class, five or six problem sets, and a cumulative final exam.


PHIL 599R - Thesis Research

(Permission Required)  

 

PHIL 789-000 - Topics In Philosophy
Verene, Tues, 2-5pm

(Same as CPLT 751 007 and ENG 789 002)                                          

Content:
James Joyce, when asked by friends how to understand Finnegans Wake, told them to read Vico’s New Science. As Joyce based Ulysses on Homer’s Odyssey, he based Finnegans Wake on Vico’s Scienza nuova. To write a big book requires another big book on which to base it. Joyce said, “My imagination grows when I read Vico as it doesn’t when I read Freud or Jung.
”These two works will be read in combination. Attention will also be given to the doctrine of the coincidence of opposites that Joyce derives from Giordano Bruno and Nicholas of Cusa, and to Samuel Beckett’s essay, “Dante . . . Bruno. Vico . . Joyce”.
The seminar will begin with consideration of the general question of the connection between philosophy and literature stemming from Plato’s ancient quarrel with the poets in the tenth book of the Republic. This quarrel is likely the source of Joyce’s claim early in his career that he distrusted Plato. Is there a way to resolve the quarrel through Vioc’s conception of “poetic wisdom” that leads to Joyce’s “commodius vicus of recirculation” and “wholemole millwheeling vicociclometer”?    

Text:
James Joyce, Finnegans Wake, Penguin Books, ISBN 0-14-118126-5 paper

Giambattista Vico, New Science, trans. Bergin and Fisch, Cornell University Press, ISBN 0-8014-9265-3 and Autobiography, trans. Bergin and Fisch, Cornell, ISBN 0-8014-9088-x paper

Particulars: End-of-semester seminar paper
                                             

PHIL 789-001 Topic: Ethics
Willett, Wed, 2-5pm    

Content:
The course aims to develop relational, affect, and eros ethics as contemporary traditions.  After examining their historical emergence the first week of the seminar, we take up contemporary questions from two major topics:  interspecies ethics and animal studies; and vulnerability, empathy, and shame as exposed by comic ridicule and laughter.   We close with one week on apocalypse studies, focusing on criticality theory from quantum physics and environmental disaster.  

Text:
Among our authors and readings are Teresa Brennan, Judith Butler, Donna Haraway, Matthew Calarco, and animal studies articles, Deleuze/Guattari excerpt from Thousand Plateaus, Bergson, Leslie Jameson’s Empathy Exams, Silvan Thomkins and Anthony Steinbock on shame and joy, and a primer on criticality theory from Yrjo Haila and Chuck Dyke’s How Nature Speaks

Particulars:  Grading based on class discussions and final 16-18 page essay.

PHIL 789-002 Topic: Foucault
Huffer, Wed, 2-5pm  Candler Library 125 

Note: This is a combined section class - Same as WGS 589R and CPLT 751 002)

Content:

Text:

Particulars:


PHIL 789-003  Topic: Art & Acts of Justice
Shoshana Felman  Mon, 4-7pm  Callaway Center N106                                  

Note: This is a combined section class

Content:

Text:

Particulars: 

PHIL 789-004 Topic: Derrida
Geoffrey Bennington, Thurs, 1-4pm Callaway Center C202                                         

Notes: This is a combined section class

Content:

Text:

Particulars:  
       

PHIL 797R - Directed Study

(Permission Required)                                                                


PHIL 799R - Advanced Research
(Permission Required)                    

 

Fall 2015 Courses

PHIL 524R-000 - Descartes and Spinoza: Metaphysics
Goldenbaum, Tues, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content: The course will focus on the metaphysics and epistemology of two of the most influential rationalists. Descartes’s Principles of Philosophy shaped not only modern philosophy but also modern science, studied also by Newton. He began to understand everything in the world through its cause and to grasp the mathematical structures of all natural phenomena. While Descartes stopped short at the human mind sparing it from his scientific apporach, Spinoza submitted the human mind to the same treatment and studied human emotions in a scientific way. His findings are only recognized in our own time when moral philosophy is struggling with the challenging results of neuroscience. Most important, Spinoza explained how human beings, although being part of nature and thus limited in their power, can yet achieve freedom.  

Text

Descartes, Rules for the Direction of the Mind

Descartes, Discourse on Method

Descartes, Principles of Philosophy

Spinoza, Descartes’ Principles of Philosophy, demonstrated by the geometrical method

Spinoza, Treatise on the Improvement of Understanding

Spinoza, Ethics

These works are included in:

- René Descartes, The Philosophical Writings, 3 vol., Cambridge UP, ISBN-10: 0521637120; ISBN-10:0521288088 ; ISBN-10:0521423503.

Or ISBN-13: 978-0521288071; ISBN-13: 978-0521288088; ISBN-13: 978-0521423502.

- Spinoza, The Collected Works, Princeton UP, ISBN: 9780691072227

Particulars

Grading based on

- Timely and thoughtful completion of the readings assigned for the class

- Regular class attendance and thoughtful contribution to the class discussion

- one seminar paper about a topic from a given list (18 pages)

PHIL 525R-000 - Topics in Modern Philosophy: Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason
Huseyinzadegan, Mon, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content: This course is a graduate seminar on Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. We will practice two simultaneous analytics in this class: we will both situate this text within the history of Western philosophy (backward and forward-looking) and engage with a number of 20th century interpretations. A general familiarity with Kant’s ouvre is recommended but not required. Guiding foci of the seminar include the relationship between epistemology and metaphysics, the problem of dualism, the transcendental and critical method, and the nature of pure reason. 

Texts

Required: Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason, The Cambridge Edition (9780521657297)

This will be the primary translation – other editions or translations can only be used as secondary sources.

Recommended: Henry Allison, Kant’s Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defense (9780300102666)

Additional required and recommended texts will be posted on Blackboard. 

Grading: Attendance and Participation are mandatory. Students will be required to write 1) A brief Exegesis and Analysis of a passage from the assigned reading to be used for discussion in class; 2) A total of 5 (five) Brief Weekly Reflection papers; and 3) A Final Research Paper (3000words) utilizing secondary sources. 

PHIL 531R-000 - Topics in 19th Century Philosophy: Fichte, Schelling, Hegel
Mitchell, Wed, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content

In this course we will explore German Idealism at its most volatile period, 1794–1802, as figured in the works of Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. Proceeding chronologically, we will track the hypotheses, criticisms, and responses of our authors as they struggle to redefine the task and nature of philosophy itself. The course proceeds chronologically, in three units:

1. Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre and the Absolute I

We begin with Fichte’s Science of Knowledge (Wissenschaftslehre) of 1794, a text which argues for the “absolute” or “self-grounding” character of the “I.” We then turn to some of Schelling’s earliest writings while still under the influence of Fichte (especially “Of the I as Principle of Philosophy, or On the Unconditional in Human Knowledge,” 1795) as well as Fichte’s response to these texts (in his An Attempt at a New Presentation of the Wissenschaftslehre from 1797–98).

2. Schelling’s Naturphilosophie and the Break with Fichte

In this unit, we examine Schelling’s development of a Naturphilosophie (philosophy of nature) and its place within his own system of transcendental idealism (1797–1800). Schelling’s emphasis on nature, rather than the I, ultimately leads to a rupture in his relation to Fichte. We examine that rupture in the Fichte/Schelling correspondence, paying special attention to Fichte’s critique of Schelling and Schelling’s new “Presentation of My System of Philosophy” (1801).

3. Hegel’s Differenzschrift

Here we turn to Hegel and his assessment of Fichte and Schelling in his early The Difference between Fichte’s and Schelling’s System of Philosophy (1802). This essay is more than a summary treatment of his predecessors, but an introduction to Hegel’s own dialectical method and system of philosophy.

It is hoped that through this course, students will come to know Fichte’s seminal Science of Knowledge, appreciate the origins of Schelling’s own philosophizing independent of Fichte, and understand Hegel’s emergence from out of the shadows of his predecessors.

Details: 

attendance and participation

class presentation

term paper

Text

Fichte. “Concerning the Concept of the Wissenschaftslehre” (pdf)

________. Science of Knowledge (Cambridge)

________. Introductions to the Wissenschaftslehre (Hackett)

Schelling. “Of the I as Principle of Philosophy” (pdf)

________. “Introduction” to Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature. (pdf).

________. “Introduction to the Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature, or, On the Concept of Speculative Physics and the Internal Organization of a System of this Science” (pdf).

________. “On the World Soul (extracts)” (pdf).

Vater and Wood, eds. The Philosophical Rupture between Fichte and Schelling (SUNY)

Hegel. The Difference between Fichte’s and Schelling’s System of Philosophy (SUNY)

Particulars:

PHIL 541R-000 - Topics in 20th Century Philosophy: Foucault, The Order of Things
Flynn, Tues, 6-9 pm Max: 18

Content: These are two of Foucault's most important works. The Order of Things went through many printings soon after its publication in 1966. It was commonly considered the “manifesto” of the Structuralist movement that was at its height at that time. It is still considered a seminal work that is well worth its sometimes difficult passages. Discipline and Punish, which appeared nine years later, marked Foucault's later turn to the “genealogical” axis of his thought, is a deceptively easier read but no less revolutionary in its consequences. Foucault has rightly been called a “kaleidoscopic” writer in the sense that he turns his reader's view ever so slightly so that they can never again view that topic as they had before.

TextThe Order of Things and Discipline and Punish (Vintage paperback available in Emory Bookstore)

Particulars:  Because this is a seminar, each seminarist will be expected to present in print and defend orally a five-page exposition and critique of a section of OT and of DP . Final essay of twelve pages (length of a presentation in an APA session) will be delivered at the end of the term. Deadlines can be discussed in class.

Attendance at the meetings is expected and participation in the discussions is required as well. The final essay will count 40% of the grade, each shorter paper and its defense will count 20% and the general class participation will constitute the remaining 20%.

PHIL 571R-000 - Philosophy, Whiteness, and Identity
Yancy, Wed, 6-9 pm Max: 18

Content

Only recently have philosophers begun to explore the question of whiteness.  Like the subject of race, more generally, philosophers have not given attention to the philosophical importance of whiteness. Yet, whiteness shapes many of the very assumptions that philosophers hold about knowledge, epistemic credibility, who constitutes a philosopher, assumptions about human persons, human subjectivity, aesthetics, transcendence and facticity, perception, the body, questions about complicity, and the relationship between whiteness and racism. We will read material that directly addresses the ways in which whiteness shapes the field of western philosophy and its many assumptions. We will explore the insights of whites who have used the genre of autobiography as a way of exploring the lived meaning of whiteness, its privilege and power. Here we will explore the theme of confession within the context of whiteness studies. We will also examine the ways in which whiteness has been addressed in the area of critical pedagogy, that is, we will explore questions about how whiteness relates to pedagogical dynamics, power within the classroom, and the ways in which whiteness resists being the object of critical inquiry within the context of white teacher formations. We will examine ways in which whiteness continues to be a site a power and privilege; we will collectively mark ways in which whiteness functions as a transcendental norm and what this means for those who are not white, for processes of knowledge-formation, self-formation, the unconscious, etc.  

Text

Required readings:

Yancy, G.  Look, a White! Philosophical Essays on Whiteness (Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA: 2012).

Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye. (Plume, NY: 2007). 

These texts will be supplemented with journal articles and book chapters.

Recommended:

Joe R Feagin's The White Racial Frame: Centuries of Racial Framing and Counter-Framing (Routledge, NY: 2010).

Yancy, G. White Self-Criticality beyond Anti-Racism: How Does it Feel to be a White Problem? (Lexington Books, Lanham, MD: 2015)  

Particulars: Final seminar paper.

PHIL 599R: Thesis Research (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 700-000 - Research Methods
Stuhr, Thurs, 11:30 am - 12:45 pm Max: 10

Content: This seminar is intended for, and required of, all philosophy Ph.D. students in their first year of study at Emory University. The course seeks to provide students with an opportunity to: reflect on and develop academic research, analysis, interpretation, application, reading, and writing skills; plan a successful personal program of graduate study, professional placement, and professional advancement, and become able to draw on financial and other professional resources necessary for this; and critically consider philosophies of teaching and their implications for multiple aspects and styles of successful teaching in the discipline of philosophy. The course will draw on brief contemporary readings, presentations by many Emory philosophy professors as coordinated by the course’s instructor, and the resources of the Woodruff Library, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, and related Centers and Institutes at Emory, as well as the American Philosophical Association.

Format:  This course will function as a seminar. Most class meetings will include both informal presentations and substantial discussion. Students are expected to participate actively and fully in all class meetings.

Text: All required readings will be distributed electronically, from texts that include: several recent chapters and articles by Emory philosophy faculty; H. Bedau’s Thinking and Writing About Philosophy (2nd ed.); The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career; William Germano, Getting it Published; Chicago Handbook for Teachers;and, Steven Cahn, From Student to Scholar.

Requirements:

1   Preparation for, attendance at, and active participation in every seminar meeting.

2   Completion of 10 one-two page writing assignments; writing assignments will be graded pass/fail and may be rewritten once.   Each requirement will count for 50% of the course grade.  Students who satisfy the first requirement and receive passing grades on all writing assignments will receive an A in the course.

PHIL 777R: Pedagogy
Mitchell, Tues 11:30 am-12:45 pm Max: 18

PHIL 789-000 - Topics in Philosophy: Irigaray & Kristeva (Cross-Listed with PSP and WGS)
McAfee, Mon, 6-9 pm Max: 18

Content

This graduate seminar will focus on the philosophical and psychoanalytic writings of two of the leading “French Feminists” of our time: the Belgian feminist and psychoanalyst Luce Irigaray and the Bulgarian-French psychoanalyst and philosopher Julia Kristeva.  

Text

Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman

Irigaray, Luce. This Sex Which Is Not One

Irigaray, Luce. The Ethics of Sexual Difference

Irigaray, Luce. Sexes and Genealogies

Irigaray, Luce. Thinking the Difference

Kristeva, Julia. Melanie Klein

Kristeva, Julia. Tales of Love

Kristeva, Julia. Black Sun

Kristeva, Julia. New Maladies of the Soul

Kristeva, Julia. “Reliance, or Maternal Eroticism” in the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 62:1, February 2014.

Oliver, Kelly. The Portable Kristeva.

Recommended background reading: 

Entry on Irigaray in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy http://www.iep.utm.edu/irigaray/

The European Graduate School biography on Kristeva http://www.egs.edu/library/julia-kristeva/biography/

Particulars

Students will (1) participate fully in weekly seminar meetings; (2) in groups of 2-3, give two presentations during the semester, one on Irigaray and the other on Kristeva, each of which summarizes and assesses some of the criticisms that have been levied against these thinkers and the accounts offered in response; and (3) submit a final seminar paper.

PHIL 789-001 - 20th Contemporary Legal Theory
Sullivan, Thurs, 1-4 pm Max: 18

Content: This seminar will focus on developing a theoretical and practical understanding of contemporary legal theory.  We will investigate the philosophical underpinnings and consequences for policy and adjudication of several competing approaches to legal theory, such as liberalism, libertarianism, feminism, pragmatism, critical legal studies, and law and economics. What do these theories recommend to judges who interpret laws, legislators who craft laws, and citizens who must abide by them?  In the course of our investigations we will pay special attention to the following questions:  (1) What is law? (2) What are the proper goals of law? (3) What makes law legitimate? (4) What is the relationship between morality and law? (5) Under what conditions should communities enforce community values upon individuals? (6) Under what conditions should the international community enforce its values upon particular governments? and (7) How would the implementation of particular legal theories function to foster or hinder the development of “individuals” and the larger community?

Text

(1)  Dworkin, Taking Rights Seriously (978-0674867116);  (2)  Epstein, Forbidden Grounds (978-0674308091);  (3)  Balkin, Cultural Software (978-0300084504) (4)  MacKinnon, Feminism Unmodified (978-0674298743);  (5) Calabresi, Tragic Choices (978-0393090857); (6) Nussbaum, Sex and Social Justice (978-0195112108); (7) Posner, Law, Pragmatism, & Democracy (978-0674018495); (8) Sullivan, Legal Pragmatism (978-0253219060) and (8) Delgado, Critical Race Theory (978-0814721353).

Particulars: Grading - short papers, seminar presentation, term paper.

PHIL 797R - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 799R-00P - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

Spring 2015 Courses

PHIL 501R-000 - Topics in Ancient Philosophy: Aristotle
Jimenez, Wed, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content:

Text

Particulars:

PHIL 531-000 - Topics in 19th Century Philosophy
Lysaker, Thurs, 1-4 pm Max: 18

Content:

We will explore the writings of two very distinctive philosophical voices, linked by influence as well as their very different but provocative outsiders status. (Nietzsche is everyone's favorite outsider, while Emerson is a philosopher for only a few.) We will consider overlapping and divergent themes (nature, power, virtues, the divine, etc.) as well as the performative structures and gestures that give each their distinctive philosophical character. This will involve a close look at the Emersonian "essay" as well as whatever one should term a text like *Beyond Good and Evil.* (Be forewarned: I do not believe that Nietzsche's style, at least by the time of *The Gay Science,* is well served by the category "aphorism.") Third, we will devote some  attention to Emerson's influence on Nietzsche and a bit more to the logic of indirect reading/quotation. But for the most part, each will be read as a powerful intellectual presence in his own right.

Workload will include a two short papers and corresponding presentations as well as a term paper.

Here is the likely order of readings.

Week One: Uses of Great Men, The American Scholar, The Divinity School Address          Week Two: Method of Nature; Nature (1844)

Week Three: Self-Reliance; Circles

Week Four: The Poet; Shakespeare

Week Five: Experience; Montaigne

Week Six: Fate; Power

Week Seven: Politics; New England Reformers; Address on the Emancipation of Slaves from the British West Indies; Race; The Fugitive Slave Law

Week Eight: Use and Abuse of History for Life; Schopenhauer as Educator Week Nine: Gay Science Week Ten: Gay Science Week Eleven: Beyond Good and Evil Week Twelve: Beyond Good and Evil Week Thirteen: Genealogy of Morals Week Fourteen: Genealogy of Morals

Text: Students must use the editions noted.

*The Annotated Emerson,* Ed. Mikics, Harvard, 978-0674049239

Nietzsche, *Untimely Meditations,* 2nd Ed., Cambridge, 978-0521585842

Nietzsche, *Gay Science,* Cambridge, 978-0521636452

Nietzsche, *Beyond Good and Evil,* Random House, 978-0679724650

Nietzsche, *On the Genealogy of Morals,* Random House, 978-0679724629

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 540R-000 - 20th Century Philosophy Seminar: Merleau-Ponty
Bredlau, Wed, 6-9 pm Max: 18

Content: We will focus on Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception. Phenomenologists like Merleau-Ponty argue that our understanding of ourselves and our world must be grounded in the careful description of our experience. To begin thinking about the phenomenological method and the new conception of perception it reveals, we will read the Introduction to the Phenomenology of Perception. Next, we will read major sections of Part One, in which Merleau-Ponty argues that perception is fundamentally embodied, and Part Two, in which Merleau-Ponty works out the implications of an embodied conception of perception for our understanding of sensation, space, objects, and other people. We will conclude by reading some of Merleau-Ponty’s later work, including his essay, “Cezanne’s Doubt.”

Text: Phenomenology of Perception, Maurice Merleau-Ponty (ISBN-13: 978-0415834339) - Translated by Donald Landes

Particulars: Assignments will include several short explication papers, class presentations and a final term paper.

PHIL 541R-000 - Topics in 19th Century Philosophy: James, Deleuze, and Radical Empiricism (This course will be cross-listed with COMP LIT)
Stuhr, Tues, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content:  This seminar investigates the meaning and nature of radical empiricism(s) as a means for understanding and comparing the philosophies of William James and Gilles Deleuze (both of whom labeled themselves radical empiricists) and, more broadly, for understanding and comparing American pragmatism and French post-structuralism.  The course will move back and forth between James and Deleuze throughout, but roughly.  In this context:  first third of the course will focus on James and his late essays on radical empiricism, philosophical temperament, and pluralism; the second third of the course will concentrate on Deleuze’s work on difference, surfaces, and the nature of philosophy; and the final third of the course will take up recent work on pragmatism and Deleuze.

Text:  Many readings will be made available through the courses’s blackboard site.  The required texts will be:  The Writings of William James, ed. John J. McDermott (though students may use other editions of James’s work, especially for Essays in Radical Empiricism and A Pluralistic Universe); Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition and (with Guattari) What is Philosophy; and, Deleuze and Pragmatism (eds. Bignall, Bowden, and Patton).

Particulars:  Course requirements include, in addition to class attendance and participation, a final seminar paper developed in consultation with the instructor on a relevant topic chosen by each individual student, and two or three very short papers (one raising questions, one an analysis of reading, and one a critical engagement).

PHIL 570-000 - Ethics
Fotion, Mon, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content:  This seminar will canvass the major ethical (aka meta-ethical) theorists around today (or were around until recently) in the Anglo-American tradition.  These include intuitionists (Moore, Prichard and Ross), contractarians (Rawls and Scanlon, Kantians (Rawls and Korgaard), prescriptivist (Hare and Gibbard, language theorists (Hare and Habermas – how did he get in here?), virtue theorists (Hursthouse and Taylor, and naturalists (Boyd).  The emphasis in the seminar will be on contemporary writers rather than those of the recent past.  We will thus include in our reading writings by, for example, R. Dworkin and Parfet.

Text: Darwall, Gibbard and Railton Moral Discourse and Practice, Oxford University Press, 1997.

ISBN: 9780195096699 (pbk.)

Particulars

PHIL 599R: Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 789-000 - "Biography, Autobiography, and Scandal: Literature as Testimony and as Courtroom Drama" (Same as CPLT 751-000)
Felman, Mon, 4-7 pm Max: 2

Content:  History has put on trial a series of outstanding thinkers. At the dawn of philosophy, Socrates drinks the cup of poison to which he is condemned by the Athenians, charged with atheism and corruption of the youth.  Centuries later, in modernity, similarly influential teacher, Oscar Wilde, is condemned by the English for his homosexuality, as well as for his provocative artistic views. In France, Flaubert and Baudelaire are both indicted as criminals for their literary works; Emile Zola is condemned for defending a Jew against the state, which has (wrongly) convicted him. Different forms of censorship are instigated by religious institutions, as well as by psychoanalytic ones. The French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan – who practices and teaches new techniques—is expelled from the International Psychoanalytical Association, and perceives his expulsion as a religious “excommunication” (Luther, Spinoza). Through the examination of a series of historical and literary trials, this course will ask:  Why are literary writers, philosophers and creative thinkers, repetitively put on trial, and how in turn do they put society on trial? Can these trials be viewed as autobiographies of sorts, or as biographies of scandal? What is the role of literature as a political actor in the struggles over ethics and the struggles over meaning?  And finally: how does literature become the writing of a destiny, or what can be called “Life-Writing”?

Text: Selected authors for Spring 2015: Plato (Apology; Crito; Philosophy on trial; Plato’s experience of his mentor’s execution); Oscar Wilde (Sexuality, art, and biography on trial: Wilde’s writings--novel, plays, autobiography, ballad; and Wilde’s biography – in literary memoirs narrated by his friend and colleague, the French writer André Gide); Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary, novel on trial); Charles Baudelaire (Flowers of Evil, poetry on trial: exemplary poems studied); Herman Melville (Billy Budd, one of the richest literary illustrations of “Law in Literature”: a story of Innocence on trial).

Particulars: Regular attendance; two short papers distributed in the course of the semester; brief oral presentations; weekly one-page reading reports, and active (annotated) preparation of texts for class discussion; ongoing participation.

PHIL 789-00P - Feminist Political Theory (Same as POLS 585-03P, WGS 753)
Sparks, Tues, 1:30-4:30 pm, Max: 12

Content:  This seminar focuses on contemporary feminist and queer political theory (post-1985) that uses gender and sexuality as critical lenses both to re-read and critique the Western canon in political philosophy and to develop new substantive theories of politics. The primary goal of this course is to expose students to recent feminist efforts to think critically about politics, and the intersections between politics, economics, and society. We will pay particular attention to feminist theories of the state, democracy, and citizenship, but we will explore these concerns via a broad range of feminist writings, including feminist legal theory, critical social theory, queer theory, cultural theory, public policy, and political economy. We will also consider the complexities of using politics and democracy as analytic categories in feminist and queer work.

Text:

Readings will be drawn from the following, and other readings on reserve:

Carole Pateman, The Sexual Contract (Stanford, 1988)

Catharine A. MacKinnon, Toward a Feminist Theory of the State (Harvard, 1989)

Nancy Fraser, Unruly Practices: Power, Discourse, and Gender in Contemporary Social Theory (Minnesota, 1989)

Susan Miller Okin, Justice, Gender, and the Family (Basic Books, 1989)

Iris Marion Young, Justice and the Politics of Difference (Princeton, 1990)

Patricia Williams, The Alchemy of Race and Rights (Harvard, 1992)

Wendy Brown, States of Injury:  Power and Freedom in Late Modernity (Princeton, 1995)

Judith Butler, Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative (Routledge, 1997)

Lauren Berlant, The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship (Duke, 1997)

Barbara Cruikshank, The Will to Empower: Democratic Citizens and Other Subjects (Cornell, 1999)

Linda M. G. Zerilli, Feminism and the Abyss of Freedom (Chicago 2005)

Jasbir Puar, Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times (Duke, 2007)

Anna Marie Smith, Welfare Reform and Sexual Regulation (Cambridge, 2007)

Samuel Chambers and Terrell Carver, Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics (Routledge 2008)

Kathy Ferguson, Emma Goldman: Political Thinking in the Streets (Rowman & Littlefield 2011)

Bonnie Honig, Antigone, Interrupted (Cambridge, 2013)

Eithne Luibheid, Pregnant on Arrival: Making the Illegal Immigrant (Minnesota, 2013)

Bonnie Mann, Sovereign Masculinity: Studies in Gender in the War on Terror (Oxford, 2014)

Particulars:  Active and informed participation in seminar discussions, 7 short papers, one final seminar paper.

PHIL 797R - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 799R-00P - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

Fall 2014 Courses

PHIL 500R-000 - Ancient Philosophy Seminar: Plato's Metaphysics
Patterson, Wed, 6-9 pm Max: 18

Content:

Particulars:

PHIL 521-000 - Topics in Renaissance Philosophy: Origins of Modern Philosophy
Hartle, Wed, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content: We will examine the origins of modern philosophy in the Essays of Montaigne, the political philosophy of Machiavelli, and the new science of Francis Bacon.

Texts: Machiavelli, Discourses on Livy, trans. Harvey C. Mansfield and Nathan Tarcov, University of Chicago Press – (ISBN:9780226500362)


Machiavelli, The Prince, trans. Harvey Mansfield, University of Chicago Press – 
(ISBN: 9780226500447)

Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays of Montaigne, trans. Donald M. Frame, Stanford University Press, (ISBN9780804704861)


Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, trans. Peter Urbach, Open Court,(ISBN:9780812692457)

Particulars: Participation, Final paper

PHIL 525R-000 - Topics in Modern Philosophy: Kant's Practical Philosophy
Huseyinzadegan, Mon, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content: Kant’s practical philosophy consists of a set of principles governing the domain of the practices of freedom; as such, it runs throughout his writings on morality, politics, history, and anthropology. Thus this graduate seminar will be dedicated to a broad examination of the different forms that practical philosophy takes throughout Kant’s œuvre, such as moral theory, political philosophy, philosophy of history, and pragmatic anthropology. Readings include selections from Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals,Critique of Practical ReasonCritique of JudgmentMetaphysics of MoralsAnthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, as well as his essays “Perpetual Peace,” “Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Intent,” “Conflict of the Faculties,” “On the Common Saying: That may be correct in theory, but it is of no use in practice,” “What is Enlightenment?,” “On the Use of Teleological Principles in Philosophy,” and “What is Orientation in Thinking?”
No prior knowledge of Kant is required. This seminar is well suited both for those who are interested in learning more about Kant’s philosophical system and practical philosophy, and for those who are interested more broadly in the relationship between moral theory, politics, history, and anthropology.

Text: Immanuel Kant. Practical Philosophy. The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant. Tr. Mary J. Gregor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.(ISBN: 978-0521654081) 
Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 530R-000 - 19th Century Philosophy: Hegel's Phenomenology
Rand, Tues, 6-9 pm Max: 18

Content: The Phenomenology of Spirit is Hegel’s most influential work, often figuring either as the culmination of one or another (usually “metaphysical”) tradition, or as the inaugural work in some further (usually “modern”) project, or as both. In this extraordinary book, Hegel articulates the self-critical structure of experience, preparing his readers for the later systematic exhibition of the self-grounding nature of thought (“logic”), the world (“nature”), and our cultural and political institutions and practices (“spirit”). This articulation requires a detailed consideration of (what for Hegel counts as) the entirety of modern Western life and its history — a consideration presented through radical methodological innovations, painstaking logical analyses, and a sweeping sense of philosophical-historical mission.  This course will be taught by Professor Sebastian Rand.

Text: Required:

- Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. Miller (Oxford U P: 1976), ISBN: 0198245971
- D. Moyar & M. Quante, eds., Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit: A Critical Guide (Cambridge U P: 2011), ISBN: 0521182778
- Students should also download a copy of Terry Pinkard’s draft translation of the Phenomenology, available as a PDF here:
http://terrypinkard.weebly.com/phenomenology-of-spirit-page.html
- The PDF includes the German text opposite Pinkard’s English translation. If a free-standing German text is desired, you should acquire on your own either the Meiner (ISBN: 978-3-7873-0769-2) or Suhrkamp (ISBN 978-3-518-28203-8) editions.  Note that German language ability is not a pre-requisite for this course.

Particulars: Attendance at every session is expected.  A brief paraphrase of a passage from Hegel will be due each week, along with a 1200-1600 word expository paper at midterm, a review covering 3-5 pieces of secondary literature just after Thanksgiving, and a final 5000-word seminar paper at end of term (on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor).

PHIL 541R-000 - Topics in 20th Century Philosophy: Authenticity: Virtue Ethics Meets Existentialism and Vice Versa
Flynn, Mon, 6-9 pm Max: 10

Content: Seminar. Each seminarist will present and defend at least one small (5-6 pp.) paper in class and a term essay (ca. 12-15 pp.) at the end of the course. Online class discussion is essential to the seminar experience and is required. There is no final exam, but class participation is important and will figure in the final grade.

Text: The following four texts in paperback are required. In addition, we shall read and discuss a number of essays or chapters of books that deal with the problem of "authenticity" as a moral issue. A list of relevant texts for research is on our course Reserve shelf in the Library.
There is a recent revival of interest in the relation between "Virtue ethics" and the concept of "authenticity" that is central to Existentialist thought but also has relevance to the broad discussion of "moral value" generally. Respecting the traditional association of Virtue ethics with gthe thought of Aristotle, we shall begin with a close reading of relevant portions of his Nichomachean Ethics that discuss intellectual and moral virtues, focusing especially on the virtue of "prudence," which has been called "situation conscience." Using prudence as the "he ralbridge concept" for our move to Existential ethics, we shall read books and essays that affirm this project as well as some that are critical of both terms of the relationship as being inadequate to meet the demands of our ethical "intuitions."
1) Aristotle, The Nicomachean Ethics (trans. David Ross, rev. Lesley Brown), Oxford World Classics, Oxford University Press, 2009 ISBN 978-0199213610
2) De Beauvoir, Simone, The Ethics of Ambiguity (trans, Bernard Frechtman), Citadel Press, Published by Kensington Publishing, NYC 2000, ISBN 0-8065-0160-X
3) Charles Taylor, The Ethics of Authenticity, Harvard Univ. Press, 1999, ISBN 0-674-26863-6
Only available in hardback and possibly out of print, but should be readily available used.
4) Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism is a Humanism (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000),
ISBN 978-0-300-11546-8

Various essays for discussion TBA.

Particulars:
Since this is a seminar, the important components are the reading, writing and discussion of philosophical texts. There will be no exams, but each seminarist will be expect to have kept up with the reading, been active in the discussions, have presented two five-page seminar essays for oral defense in the class during the semester and written a final term essay of about fifteen to twenty pages–the length of an essay to be submitted for presentation at a professional meeting or for publication.

PHIL 571-000 - Political Philosophy Seminar: Habermas & His Critics
McAfee, Tues, 2-5 pm Max: 18

Content: Jürgen Habermas is easily one of the most important and influential philosophers of the past half century. The most prominent member of the second generation of Frankfurt School critical theory, he has made huge strides in contemporary intellectual thought. At the same time, Habermas may be as controversial as he is famous. A self-professed intellectual continuing “the project of the Enlightenment,” he has raised the ire of many contemporary philosophers who would just as soon dispense with the Enlightenment. Despite his critics, Habermas’s work has been enormously influential and helpful in democratic theory, the social sciences, globalization studies, aesthetics, epistemology, and philosophy of language. The purpose of this graduate seminar is two-fold: (1) to provide an opportunity to deeply engage his work and (2)  to examine how this work has touched off controversies with his contemporaries and how these controversies have been met (sometimes with an apology). We will focus most directly on Habermas’s engagements with these three groups: defenders of the first generation of critical theory; poststructuralists such as Derrida and Foucault; and feminist theorists such as Fraser and Young. Time and interest permitting, we may also read and discuss Habermas’s engagements with Rawls.

Text: Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, ISBN 9780262581080
Habermas, Theory of Communicative Action, volume I, ISBN 9780807015070
Habermas, Theory of Communicative Action, volume II, ISBN 9780807014011
Habermas, Moral Consciousness and Communicative Action, ISBN 
Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, ISBN 9780262581028 
Habermas, Between Facts and Norms, ISBN 9780262581622
Other readings available electronically, including texts by Seyla Benhabib, Richard Bernstein, Craig Calhoun, Jacques Derrida, Enrique Dussel, Nancy Fraser, Axel Honneth, Doug Kellner. John Rawls, and Iris Marion Young.

Grading: Weekly participation and short response papers. Final seminar paper.

PHIL 599R: Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 700-000 - Research Methods
Stuhr, Tues, 11:30 am - 12:45 pm Max: 18

Content:  This seminar is intended for, and required of, all philosophy Ph.D. students in their first year of study at Emory University. The course seeks to provide students with an opportunity to: reflect on and develop academic research, analysis, interpretation, application, reading, and writing skills; plan a successful personal program of graduate study, professional placement, and professional advancement, and become able to draw on financial and other professional resources necessary for this; and critically consider philosophies of teaching and their implications for multiple aspects and styles of successful teaching in the discipline of philosophy. The course will draw on brief contemporary readings, presentations by many Emory philosophy professors as coordinated by the course’s instructor, and the resources of the Woodruff Library, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, and related Centers and Institutes at Emory, as well as the American Philosophical Association.

Format: This course will function as a seminar. Most class meetings will include both informal presentations and substantial discussion. Students are expected to participate actively and fully in all class meetings.


Texts: Required readings will be distributed electronically, from texts that include: several recent chapters and articles by Emory philosophy faculty; H. Bedau’s Thinking and Writing About Philosophy (2nd ed.); The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career; William Germano, Getting it Published; Chicago Handbook for Teachers;and, Steven Cahn, From Student to Scholar.

Requirements:

  1. Preparation for, attendance at, and active participation in every seminar meeting.
  2. Completion of 12 one-two page writing assignments; writing assignments will be graded pass/fail and may be rewritten once.   Each requirement will count for 50% of the course grade.  Students who satisfy the first requirement and receive passing grades on all writing assignments will receive an A in the course.

PHIL 777-000 - Pedagogy 
Lysaker, Thurs, 11:30 am - 12:45 pm Max: 10

PHIL 789-000 - Theories of Subjectivity (Same as FREN 770)
Judovitz, Tues, 1 - 4 pm Max:

Content: This course examines the emergence and consolidation of modern notions of subjectivity. It traces the radical shift from notions of self to subject, based on a new understanding of truth which also implies a new way of being in the world. Combining philosophical and literary approaches, we consider Montaigne’s and d’Urfée’s elaborations of selfhood in terms of multiplicity, embodiment and embeddedness in the world. We follow with an analysis Descartes’s elaboration of rational consciousness as a foundational moment for the development of modern metaphysics. At issue will be the relation of subjectivity to representation, the mind-body dualism, and the analogy of the body to a machine along with attendant philosophical critiques by Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, and Benveniste. We conclude with an examination of the literary manifestations of the Cartesian rationalist worldview as outlined through the crisis of signs and the problems implied in attempts to secure and master representation in Mme de Lafayette’sLa Princesse de Clèves.


Required Texts: 
Montaigne, “Of Experience,” and “On Some Verses of Virgil” in  Essays; d’Urfée, L’Astrée(selections); 
Descartes, The Discourse on the Method;  
Heidegger, “The Age of the World Picture;” Merleau-Ponty, “The Cogito,” and “The Body as Expression and Speech” in The Phenomenology of Perception
Benveniste, “Of Subjectivity in Language;” 
Georges Canguilhem, “Machine and Organism;” Foucault, “The Prose of the World” and “Representing” in The Order of Things and “Technologies of the Self,” and Self-Writing inEthics
Mme de Lafayette’s Princess of Cleves

PHIL 789-001 - The Hermetic Trad.in Islam
Cornell, Thurs, 1 - 4 pm Max:

Content:


Required Texts: 

PHIL 789-006 - Platonic Tradition: Ancient-Medieval (Same as ILA 790-001)
Corrigan, Wed, 10 am - 1 pm Max: 5

Content: This course will examine some of the sources for the study of Plato, read several of the major middle Platonic dialogues, from the Symposium and Republic to the Timaeus, look at some passages from the later dialogues, examine Aristotle’s Metaphysics Book 12 as a condensed introduction to Aristotle’s thought in the context of its relation to Plato, and then show some of the power of “Platonic” thought, broadly conceived, in some late ancient authors, both pagan and Christian (such as Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus,  Gregory of Nyssa, Proclus and Pseudo-Dionysius)  before concluding with a reading of selected passages from Ibn Gabirol, a Jewish philosopher/poet writing in an Arabic philosophical milieu in the 11th Century, and Bonaventure and Aquinas in the 13th Century.

Text: TBA

 

PHIL 797R - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 799R-00P - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

Spring 2014 Courses

PHIL 500R-000 - Ancient Philosophy Seminar
Jimenez, Wed., 2-5 pm, Max: 18

Content:

Text:

Particulars:

PHIL 511-000 - Topics in Medieval Philosophy : Faith and Reason
Hartle, Fri, 2-5 pm, Max: 18

Content: We will examine the relationship between reason and faith in the writings of Christian, Jewish, and Islamic philosophers of the middle ages.

Texts: St. Augustine, Confessions, trans. Sheed (Hackett)
9780872208162

St. Anselm, Proslogion, trans. Williams (Hackett)
9780872205659

Averroes, On the Harmony of Religion and Philosophy, trans. Hourani (DBROW)
9780718902223

Maimonides, The Guide of the Perplexed (Hackett)
9780872203242

St. Thomas Aquinas, Selected Philosophical Writings, ed. McDermott (Oxford)
9780199540273

St. Thomas Aquinas, On Faith and Reason, ed. Brown (Hackett)
9780872204560

St. Thomas Aquinas, On the Eternity of the World (Marquette U. P.)
9780874622164

St. Thomas Aquinas, Treatise on Law (Regnery)
9780895267054

Duns Scotus, Philosophical Writings (Hackett)
9780872200180

Ockham, Philosophical Writings (Hackett)
9780872200784

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 520R-000 - Renaissance Philosophy and the Humanist Tradition
Verene, Mon, 2-5 pm, Max: 18

Content: This seminar concerns a sequence of five works from the graduate comprehensive (prelim) reading list, beginning with Boethius’ masterpiece of Christian humanism, Consolation of Philosophy, one of the books of universal appeal throughout the Middle Ages, to the Neoplatonic conception of the absolute maximum and coincidence of opposites of Cusanus’ Learned Ignorance, to Pico della Mirandola’s conception of syncretism and revival of the ancient pusuit of self-knowledge in his Oration, to Descartes’ dismissal of rhetoric and the moral sciences in his Discourse, to Vico’s counter to the Cartesian conception of knowledge as well as the Hobbesian natural-law theory and materialism in his philosophy of history and conception of the mythic imagination in the New Science as the leading text of the Counter-Elightenment.


These five works, spanning a great portion of the history of philosophy from the early Medieval period to the Renaissance to the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, will be considered as historical texts but in addition as texts of a philosophia perenniscarrying within them the great problems of philosophical reasoning that persist in the “phenomenology of the philosophic spirit.” 


Some questions to be raised through these texts are: How is philosophy related to myth, poetry, and rhetoric? What is the relation between philosophy and human mortality? In what does human dignity consist? Does philosophy require a conception of the absolute? Does philosophy require a conception of its own origins in human culture and society? Are there conncetions between philosophical reasoning and jurisprudential reasoning? Can there be a science of history and human nature comparable to a science of nature?

Text: Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy ISBN: 9780674990838  

Cusanus, Of Learned Ignorance ISBN: 9781556354496

Pico della Mirandola, Oration on the Dignity of Man ISBN: 9780895267139  

Descartes, Philosophical Writings vol. 1, trans. Cottingham et al. ISBN: 9780521288071

Vico, The New Science trans. Bergin and Fisch ISBN: 9780801492655

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 525R-000 - Topics in Modern Philosophy 
Huseyinzadegan, TH, 1-4 pm, Max: 18

Content: This course is a systematic study of Kant’s Critique of Judgment, both the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment and the Critique of Teleological Judgment. Through this examination, students will come to see how this work fits into the critical system by bridging the gap between theoretical and practical philosophy through the regulative principle of purposiveness [Zweckmässigkeit]. The focus will be three major themes as they occur in this work: beauty as the occasion for reflective judgments about purposiveness; morality symbolized by natural beauty; and politics understood as a matter of reflective teleological judgments. Some familiarity with and a background in Kant’s epistemology and moral philosophy is required.

Texts: Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment. Translated by Paul Guyer and Eric Mathews. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000 (a.k.a. The Cambridge Edition)


Please also obtain the German Edition (a.k.a the Meiner Edition, Kritik der Urteilskraft) if you read German in any capacity. Note that the First Introduction is published separately as Erste Einleitung in die Kritik der Urteilskraft).


Secondary sources will be posted on E-Reserves and Blackboard.

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 556R-000 - Phenomenology
Bredlau, Mon, 6-9, Max: 18

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 558R - Pragmatism
Stuhr, Wed, 6-9 pm, Max: 18

Content: This seminar focuses on ontological, epistemological, and methodological issues in the development of pragmatism from the groundbreaking writings of John Dewey—especially Experience and Nature and Logic:  The Theory of Inquiry—to the influential work of Quine, Goodman, Davidson, Putnam, Rorty, West, Unger, Elgin, and other contemporary philosophers in the pragmatist grain.  In part this is a focus on the originality of pragmatism and the way in which it dramatically reorients philosophy by means of the questions it takes up and the questions that it rejects.  In part this is a focus on the philosophical issues that mark pragmatism’s break from both analytic philosophy (including, for example, many of the authors on the philosophy Ph.D. comprehensive exam reading list) and from phenomenology (from Husserl through Merleau-Ponty)—and thus a focus on the history of 20th century philosophy.  And, in part this is a focus on the radical relational, pluralistic, and experiential (affective, embodied) orientation of pragmatism—pragmatism as philosophy’s relativity theory.

Text: Student should purchase a copy of Dewey’s Experience and Natureeither the SIU Press critical edition (this is the standard in the field) or the Dover edition or an e-book version.  Two additional books are recommended but not required: Analytic Philosophy:  An Anthology,  eds Martinich and Sosa.,; and, The Philosophy of John Dewey, ed. John J. McDermott.  All required readings other than Experience and Nature will be made available via the course’s Blackboard 
Requirements:

  1.  Seminar students are required to prepare for, attend, and participate in all seminar sessions. 
  2. Students will write two short (3 pp.) discussion papers and post comments on papers by other students. (25% of seminar grade)
  3. Students will write a final seminar paper on a topic of choice, developed in consultation with the instructor. (75% of seminar grade)

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 572-000 - Aesthetics Seminar
Lysaker, Wed, 6-9 pm, Max: 18

Content:

Text:

Grading Details:

PHIL 599R: Directed Study
(Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 797R - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 799R-00P - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

Fall 2013 Courses

PHIL 524R-000 - Spinoza and Leibniz on God, Nature, and Human Beings
Goldenbaum, Tuesday 6-9 pm, Max: 18

Content: We will focus on the approach of two major thinkers of modernity who deeply influenced European Philosophy of the last three centuries. We will focus on their approach to mathematics and science to see how it informed their epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and even their political thinking. We will discuss how Spinoza’s ethical solution for responsibility without free will can still mean a challenge within contemporary discussion of free will and discuss how philosophy of law depends on metaphysical decisions about the foundation of justice.

Texts: Spinoza, Ethics
Spinoza,  Letters
You can use any edition. Recommended though:
Spinoza, The Collected Works, vol. 1, ed. and trans. by Ed Curley, Princeton UP 1985 (21988), ISBN: 0691072221; about $ 80.00. 
 
Leibniz, Discours on Metaphysics
Recommended:
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Philosophical Papers and Letters, ed. By Leroy E. Loemker (the founder of our department) (from $120 onwards)
or
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Philosophical Essays, ed. by Roger Ariew and Daniel Garber, Hackett (around $20)

Particulars: One seminar paper of 20 pages, one short presentation on particular topics in class.

PHIL 541R-000 - Heidegger’s Being and Time: (Same as CPLT 751)
Mitchell, Th, 6:30 - 9:30 pm, Max: 13

Content: This course is a close reading of Heidegger's Being and Time. We will read the entirety of the text over the course of the semester. Being and Time is Heidegger's first magnum opus and a landmark text in phenomenology, hermeneutics, and existentialism, as well as in the history of philosophy as a whole. Heidegger's avowed goal in this work is to reawaken the question of the meaning of being. In so doing, however, he provides an overarching account of human existence (or rather "Dasein"), one that breaks with subjectivisms of all stripes (Cartesian, Husserlian) and advocates instead for an understanding of existence as a matter of "being-in-the-world." Being and Time is largely an account of what it means to exist in this way (propadeutic for asking the question of the meaning of being). Topics to be addressed thus include: the ecstatic nature of existence, the hermeneutical constitution of meaning, the centrality of mood, the practical foundation of theoretical observation, spatiality, the care of the self, death and human finitude, the call of conscience, history and tradition, as well as the temporal horizon of ontology, among others. Student presentations will take up contemporary scholarship on the week's reading or contextualize Being and Time within Heidegger's lecture courses of the period. Across all of this, the focus will remain resolutely on Being and Time as the culmination of Heidegger's investigations into fundamental ontology. A parallel German reading group of Sein und Zeit will also be offered to interested participants.

Text: Either translation is acceptable, though preference will be given to Stambaugh:

Heidegger, Martin. Being and Time. Trans. Joan Stambaugh. Rev. Dennis Schmidt. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. isbn: 1438432763

Heidegger, Martin. Being and Time. Trans. John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson. New York: Harper, 2008. 0061575593

Selected commentaries will be ordered with the bookstore as recommended reading.

Particulars: Student presentation, term paper (20 pages), attendance, participation.

PHIL 551R-000 - Ethics: Contemporary Neuroscience, Philosophical Psychology, and Animal Studies (Cross-listed with ILA)
Willett, Wednesday 2:00 - 5:00 pm, Max: 18

Content: Momentous events occurring in the material dimensions of life—via finance capital, technological innovation, discoveries in neuroscience and theories of evolution—are spinning the ground out from under mainstream ethical and political inquiry. Pockets of multispecies life and anarchic revolt suggest new idioms of belonging and a communitarian ethos.  This ethos would challenge neoliberalism, without returning to exclusionary nationalism or human exceptionalism.  Our seminar readings range from economic studies of capital and debt finance in critical ethics to animal studies and theories of co-evolution.   We consider the impact of genetic explanations of traumas passed down epigenetically across generations; forms of intelligence in the plant and animal kingdoms that the human species may lack; and that the impact of social and technological networks and related phenomena render nature/culture, affect/cognition, individual/social, and human/nonhuman binaries irrelevant.  At the end of the course, we turn to cross-species ethics in empathy and social rituals of forgiveness and reconciliation. Throughout the seminar, we inquire, what becomes of classic liberal features of moral theory such as judgment, freedom, autonomy, or moral laws?  What is ethics?

Text: Frans de Waal, Korsgaard, et al, Philosophers and Primates0691124477
Elizabeth Wilson, Psychosomatic, 978 0822333654
Catherine Malabou and Adrian Johnson, Self and Emotional Life, 978 0 231 15831
Judith Butler and Athena Athanasiou, Dispossession97807456 5381 5
Rosi Braidotti,The Posthuman, 978 0 7456 4158 4
Enrique Dussel, Ethics of Liberation, 97808223 5212 9
David Graeber, The Debt, ·  
ISBN-10: 1612191290 ·  ISBN-13: 978-1612191294

Particulars: Class participation and presentations. 18 page seminar paper.

PHIL 554R-000 - Critical Theory
Sullivan & Lysaker, Monday 6:00 - 9:00 pm, Max: 18

Content: This course will explore central issues in the philosophy of the Frankfurt School that came to be known as “critical theory.” In particular, we will focus on the question of the relation of theory and practice. We will begin by asking with Horkheimer about the mission of a critical theory. Subsequently we will investigate the nature of reason and its potential to facilitate emancipation and/or contribute to domination. Finally, we will consider the role of theory in cultural criticism, legitimation, and reconstruction.

Text: O’Connor (ed.), The Adorno Reader;
Horkheimer, Critical Theory;
Horkheimer, Eclipse of Reason;
Horkheimer and Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightenment;
Marcuse, Reason and Revolution;
Adorno, Stars Down to Earth
Adorno, Minima Moralia;
Habermas, Between Facts and Norms, and (8) Jay, Dialectical Imagination.

Particulars:

PHIL 588-000 - Symbolic Logic
Risjord, Mon/Wed 11:30 am - 12:45 pm, Max: 18

Content: This course has three goals.  First, it will introduce the techniques of contemporary symbolic logic.  We will study methods of proof and formal semantic analysis.  While the course does not presuppose prior acquaintance with symbolic logic, we will move quickly.  Students who are completely unfamiliar with symbolic logic can expect a challenge.  Second, the course will introduce the meta-theory of contemporary logic.  We will learn how to reasonabout logic and study some of the most important meta-theorems.  Finally, the course will provide a brief glimpse beyond the limitations of first-order logic.  Kant wrote that logic appears as a "closed and completed body of doctrine."  The last 50 years have seen a proliferation of formal systems, including logics of time, modality, and obligation.  Logicians have explored multiple truth values, higher order quantification, and relevance.  Logic can no longer appear closed or complete.  Its condition is postmodern.  At the end of the course, we will briefly sample some of these extensions and non-classical approaches to logic.

Text: Nolt, John.  Logics.  Wadsworth, 1997  (Note: while the textbook comes with a floppy disk, we will not be using it in this class.)

Particulars: Short homework assignments for each class, five or six problem sets, and a cumulative final exam.

PHIL 599R-000 - Thesis Research
Lysaker, Date TBA, Time TBA, Max: 18

Content: TBA

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 700-000 - Research Methods, Teaching, Philosophy & Professional Development
McAfee, Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm, Max: 18

Content: This seminar is intended for and required of all philosophy Ph.D. students in their first year of study at Emory University. The course seeks to provide students with an opportunity to for the following: reflect on and develop academic research, analysis, interpretation, application, reading, and writing skills; plan a successful personal program of graduate study, professional placement, and professional advancement, and become able to draw on financial and other professional resources necessary for this; and critically consider philosophies of teaching and their implications for multiple aspects and styles of successful teaching in the discipline of philosophy. The course will draw on brief contemporary readings, presentations by many Emory philosophy professors as coordinated by the course’s instructor, and the resources of the Woodruff Library, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, and related Centers and Institutes at Emory, as well as the American Philosophical Association.

Format: This course will function as a seminar. Most class meetings will include both informal presentations and substantial discussion. Students are expected to participate actively and fully in all class meetings.

Texts: Cahn, Steven M., From Student to Scholar: A Candid Guide to Becoming a Professor, Columbia University Press. 9780231145336
Other readings will be distributed electronically.

Particulars: Students are required to attend all class sessions, complete required reading and short writing assignments, and participate in professional development activities.

PHIL 777-000 - Philosophy and Pedagogy
McAfee, Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm, Max: 18

Content: This course is required of and open only to second year graduate students in the department of philosophy’s Ph.D. program. It is the department’s TATTO course, and it aims to develop the teaching abilities of graduate students as they begin serving as teaching assistants, co-teachers, and then teachers.

Format: This course will function as a seminar. Most class meetings will include both informal presentations and substantial discussion. Students are expected to participate actively and fully in all class meetings.

Texts: Articles and book chapters will be distributed electronically.

Particulars: Students are required to attend all class sessions, complete required reading and short writing assignments, and participate in teaching development activities.

PHIL 789-000 - Dialectics and Four French Philosophers: Sartre, Merleau--Ponty, Foucault, and Deleuze
Flynn, Monday, 2 - 5pm, Max: 18 (Because of Labor Day, 1st Class Meeting, Monday 9/9/13)

Content: I hope to give about three weeks to each of the four philosophers we will be discussing:
Sartre (Search for a Method) and maybe passages from his second, "dialectical" ethics or his lecture "Self-Consciousness and Self Knowledge."
Merleau-Ponty (Adventures of the Dialectic) and perhaps some reference to the course he gave at the College de France, though most of that material is in French.
These two will represent the "pro" on this topic.
Foucault (Discipline and Punish and a chapter from The Order of Things). I'll also inflict on you one of my essays on Foucault and the "Spacialization of Reason"
Deleuze (as bit trickier, probably portions of Discipline and Punish and The Logic of Sense) These are TBA at the moment. His little book on Foucault would work too, but in place of one of the others.
These two represent the "con" side of this controversy [dialectic?].
The contrast can be read as one between temporal and spacial reasoning, or dialectical and "analytical" reasoning or "notion" and "concept." (the French vs. the English translation of Hegelian Begriff )
Of course there is a lot more involved in this question. For example, the contrast between structure and "history."
Depending on the size of the class, each seminarist will submit for oral defense at least one short essay (5-7 pp) and then a final essay of about 15-20 pages--the kind of essay you would consider for submission to a professional journal.

I'll expect each of you to submit (on LearnLink) a question for the presenter(s) to which s/he can respond prior to our meeting on that paper.

Text: N/A

Particulars: N/A

PHIL 789-001 - Democratic Theory
Rogers, Tuesday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

Content: Democracy is a term that is often invoked.  Yet there is little agreement on its meaning in modern times.  This course examines several philosophical interpretations of democracy.  We will engage a selection of debates in democratic theory with special attention on the normative (that is, ideal standard or model) of democracy and will attempt to tease out its limitations and possibilities.  As such, special attention will be given to the conceptual accounts of democracy offered by the various thinkers we read as well as the conflicts and tensions that are contained therein.  Some themes that are central to this course include the meaning of democracy’s intrinsic and instrumental worth, the role of deliberation and its relationship to persuasion, the epistemic and moral virtues needed to sustain democracy, the problems and possibilities of pluralism, the meaning of “the people,” and the role of dissent.  Our investigation will be guided by several questions:  What is the meaning of democracy?  Is democracy the ideal form of political organization for human beings?  Is democracy a set of procedures or is it a mode of existence or way of being-in-the-world?  What is the status of rights, do they suspend democratic intervention or determine the condition of possibility.  What is the relationship between democracy on the one hand, and freedom and equality on the other?

Text:

Jack M. Balkin, Constitutional Redemption: Political Faith in an Unjust World  (Harvard UP, 2011)
Margaret Canovan, The People (Polity, 2005)
Cheryl Misak, Truth, Politics, and Morality (Routledge, 2000)
Derrick Darby, Rights, Race, and Recognition (Cambridge UP, 2009)
John Dewey, The Public and Its Problems, ed. Melvin L. Rogers (Penn State Press, 2012)
Stephen Holmes, Passions and Constraint (UChicago Press, 1995)
Edmund Morgan, Inventing the People (Norton, 1989)
John Rawls, Political Liberalism (Columbia UP, 2005)
Carl Schmitt, The Concept of the Political (UChicago Press, 2007)
Carl Schmitt, The Crisis of Parliamentary Democracy (MIT Press, 1988)
Jeffrey Stout, Democracy and Tradition  (Princeton UP)

Particular: N/A

PHIL 789-002 - Foucault (Same as WGS 589R and CPLT 751 007)
Huffer, Thursday 10 am - 1 pm, Max: 3

Content: For some decades now, it has been much easier to have a passionate opinion about Michel Foucault than an intelligent reading of him. He is a saint or a demon, a liberator or a desecrator, the heroic promoter of an agenda or the debauched prophet of despair.  This seminar will be less concerned to foster impassioned uses of Foucault, or even to analyze his remarkable susceptibility to abuse, than it will be to think with and about some texts that bear his name. We will be particularly concerned with his ‘ethical’ and ‘political’ texts—texts about the consequences of medicalizing madness or normalcy, about the powers coded into the category ‘sexuality,’ about ancient or contemporary alternatives to contemporary management of human life. Members of the seminar will be encouraged to connect their readings in Foucault with their own intellectual projects.

Text: The seminar will concentrate on texts by Foucault rather than by his interpreters. Common readings will include:


Foucault, History of Madness [1961], tr. Murphy and Khalfa (Routledge 2006)
Foucault, Speech Begins after Death [1968], tr. Bononno (Minnesota 2013)
Foucault, Abnormal [1974-1975], tr. Burchell (Picador 2004)
Foucault, Discipline and Punish [1975], tr. Sheridan (Vintage 1995)
Foucault, History of Sexuality, vol. 1: An Introduction [1976], tr. Hurley (Vintage 1990)
Foucault, Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth, tr. Hurley and others (New Press 1997)

Particular: Beyond thoughtful reading and participation, seminar members will be asked to write two medium-length exercises over the course of the semester.

PHIL 789-003 - French Feminism (Same as ILA 790 006 , WGS 585 000 and CPLT 751 004
Meighoo, Tuesday 1 - 4 pm, Max:

Content: “French feminism” is a term that is used within English-language scholarship to refer to a remarkably diverse body of theoretical and creative work associated with the emergence of second-wave feminism in the latter part of the twentieth century, as well as contemporary trends in continental philosophy including
existentialism, psychoanalysis and poststructuralism.

In this graduate seminar, we will read selected texts by some of the most prominent thinkers and writers who have been identified with French feminism, even as we will continue to call into question the value of the term “French feminism” itself.  French language skills are not required for this seminar since we will be reading these texts in their available English translations.

Text: Our assigned readings will be taken from the following texts:

  • Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex;
  • Jacques Lacan, Feminine Sexuality: Jacques Lacan and the école freudienne (ed. Juliet Mitchell and Jacqueline Rose);
  • Julia Kristeva, Revolution in Poetic Language;
  • Luce Irigaray, Speculum of the Other Woman;
  • Hélène Cixous and Catherine Clément, The Newly Born Woman;
  • Sarah Kofman, The Enigma of Woman: Woman in Freud’s Writings;
  • Monique Wittig, The Straight Mind and Other Essays.

Particular: Final course grades will be based on the following:

  • Five (5) response papers (3-4 pp. each, 40% total);
  • Long essay (15-20 pp., 40%);
  • Attendance and participation (20%)

PHIL 789-004 - From Simmel to Adorno (Same as ILA 790 007, CPLT 751 005, and HIST 585 006)
Goodstein, Wednesday 2 - 5 pm, Max:

Content: In recent years, the sociologist and philosopher of culture Georg Simmel (1858-1918) has been discovered and rediscovered by scholars in a wide range of fields. He has been lauded as a theorist of modernity—and as post-modernist avant la lettre. His writings provide a seemingly inexhaustible source of brilliant aperçus for literary scholars, philosophers, and social scientists in search of insightful observations from the previous fin-de-siècle, and his remarks on fashion, on femininity, on the intricacies of social life, on the metropolis, are ubiquitous. However, the oft-touted Simmel renaissance has not necessarily resulted in sustained engagement with his work. His magnum opus, the Philosophy of Money, remains high on the list of famous yet unread books, and his considerable influence on twentieth-century thought remains largely invisible. Simmel’s own prediction that his legacy would be “like one in cold cash,” invested “according to the nature of the heirs” in diverse undertakings that rendered its origin unrecognizable, proved all too accurate. In this seminar, we will, therefore, read Simmel and his more famous students and interlocutors—Lukács, Kracauer, Benjamin, Adorno—in an attempt to discern Simmel’s influence and to understand the reasons he has remained on the margins of intellectual history.

As a writer, Simmel was a modernist in the broadest sense, an elegant stylist with intellectual interests that spanned the full range of high and low modern culture. His highly aesthetic mode of theorizing in essayistic tours de force that leap dizzyingly from idea to idea embodies a modernist commitment to self-reflection upon the significance of form. Simmel conceived of modern “forms of life” as both empirical objects and manifestations of more profound realities. Through theoretical syntheses centered on topoi such as sociability, travel, and urban life, he developed a modernist philosophical perspective that links the historical process of objectification to the modes of experience it produces. His approach—as much style of thought as hermeneutic method—brought the concerns of the German philosophical tradition into conversation with modern cultural realities. It is an approach that resonates in the writings of the better-known philosophers and cultural critics who were his students and readers. The goal of this seminar is both to give Simmel his rightful place in the intellectual history of modern thought and to explore the potential of his interdisciplinary method for integrating symbolic and empirical dimensions in the analysis of cultural phenomena in our own time.

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 789-005 - The Cultivation of the Self (Same as FREN 700-000 and CPLT 751-006)
Judovitz, Tuesday 1 - 4 pm, Max:

Content: Based on Pierre Hadot’s "spiritual exercises" and Michel Foucault’s theoretical writings on the techniques entailed in the cultivation of the self, this course examines its elaboration in the early modern period in Montaigne’sEssays. At issue will be the relation of self-knowledge to the care of the self, insofar as its modification and transformations rely on spiritual and corporeal practices and disciplines. We begin by analyzing the philosophical traditions that informed the pagan construction of the self in Marcus Aurelius’s Meditations and its spiritual, Christian elaborations in St. Augustine’s Confessions, in order to elucidate Montaigne’s appropriation of such subjects of meditation, as the contemplation of death, illness, misfortune, friendship, sexuality, and the passions. How do strategies of stoic inspection and control of representations or later Christian models of asceticism, based on self-control and renunciation, give way to a model of self-cultivation that will seek the enjoyment rather than the reform of being?  We will consider the seminal role of reading and writing in composing the self and fashioning its “style,” which is not restricted to writing, but which as ethos of self-formation and practice of embodiment emerges as a “style of life.” In conclusion, we analyze how this meditative tradition of self-examination and cultivation is brought to an end by the Cartesian redefinition of knowledge as certitude that will radically objectify both the subject’s relations to itself and the world, thereby precluding access to its modes of conduct and being. 

Readings Include:

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations;Hadot, “Spiritual Exercises,” Philosophy as a Way of Life; Hadot, “Marcus Aurelius,”Philosophy as a Way of Life; Foucault,” Foucault, “The Cultivation of the Self,” Care of the Self;  Foucault, “Technologies of the Self,” Ethics; Foucault, The Use of Pleasure (selections); Foucault, The Care of the Self(selections); Foucault, “Self-Writing” Ethics; Foucault, “The Prose of the World,” The Order of Things”; St. Augustine, Confessions; Marin, “Echographies,” Crossreadings; Butler, “Introduction,” Bodies that Matter; Descartes, Discourse on the Method; Michel de Montaigne’s Essays (selections).

Text: Marcus Aurelius, Meditations ISBN: 0143036270
St. Augustine, Confessions ISBN-10: 014044114X
Michel de Montaigne’s Essays ISBN-10: 0804704864
Descartes, Discourse on the Method ISBN-10: 0486432521
Foucault, The Uses of Pleasure ISBN-10: 0394751221
Foucault, The Care of the Self ISBN-10: 0394741552
Other selected readings are available on Woodruff Library Direct Reserves

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 797R-00P - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Lysaker, Max: 10

PHIL 797R-01P - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Lysaker, Max: 10

PHIL 799R-00P - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Lysaker, Max: 10

Spring 2013 Courses

PHIL 501R-000 - Platonism Ancient & Modern
Patterson, Wednesday 6 - 9 pm, Max: 18

Content: TBA

Text: TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 521R-000 - Montaigne and Modernity
Hartle, Monday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

Content: We will examine the origins of modern philosophy in the Essays of Montaigne, the political philosophy of Machiavelli, and the new science of Francis Bacon.

Texts:

Machiavelli, Discourses on Livy, trans. Harvey C. Mansfield and Nathan Tarcov, University of Chicago Press, 9780226500362

Machiavelli, The Prince, trans. Harvey Mansfield, University of Chicago Press, 9780226500447

Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays of Montaigne, trans. Donald M. Frame, Stanford University Press, 9780804704861

Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, trans. Peter Urbach, Open Court, 9780812692457    

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 525R-000 - Sovereignty and Individual Rights as Achievements of Early Modern Philosophy
Goldenbaum, Monday 6 - 9 pm, Max: 18

Content: While everybody embraces individual rights, the concept of sovereignty has come under attack in recent years. This is mostly due to an ill understanding of sovereignty as absolute monarchy or dictatorship. We will discuss political theories of two major thinkers of modern political philosophy, Thomas Hobbes and Spinoza, contrasting their ideas with the then-current political theories of social contract, divine right, or right of resistance. In light of this historical context, the achievement of the early modern philosophers will come to light, having laid the ground for equal and individual rights of citizens, for the first time in human history, that need to be guaranteed by the sovereign.

TextConstitutionalism, ed. by J.F. Franklin (New York: Pegasus 1969)

Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan, and On Citizen

Spinoza’s Theologico-theological Treatise and his Political Treatise.

Particulars: One seminar paper of 20 pages, one short presentation on a small particular topic in class.

PHIL 551R-000 - Cosmopolitanism
Stuhr, Thursday 1 - 4 pm, Max: 18

Content: This seminar studies the meaning, intellectual strengths and weaknesses, and practical viability of cosmopolitanism.  The course has a double focus:  the first is normative:  cosmopolitanism as an ethics and political philosophy; the second is ontological:  cosmopolitanism as a theory of human nature and a theory of nature and world.  In pursuit of this focus, the course will examine cosmopolitanism in three different time periods:  post-Aristotelian philosophy, especially stoicism; modern European philosophy, especially Kant; and 20th century and contemporary analyses of cosmopolitanism in an age of globalization.

Text: Much of the assigned reading will be available electronically.  Required books include:  
The Stoics Reader, ed. Inwood and Gerson (Hackett 2008)

Aurelius, The Meditations, trans. Hay (Modern Library, 2003)

Kant, Toward Perpetual Peace and Other Writings, ed. Kleingeld (Yale, 2006)

Bohman and Lutz-Bachmann, Perpetual Peace:  Essays on Kant's Cosmopolitan Ideal (MIT Press, 1997);

Appiah, Cosmopolitanism:  Ethics in a World of Strangers (Norton, 2006)

Derrida, On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness (Routledge, 2001) ; Yi-Fu Tuan,
Space and Place (U Minnesota, 2001); Brown and Held, The Cosmopolitan Reader (Polity 2011).

Grading Details: Seminar requirements include a final term paper (aimed at publication) on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor, a short analytical paper and responses to papers by others, and seminar attendance and participation.  

PHIL 556R-000 - Phenomenology
Bredlau, Tuesday 6 - 9 pm, Max: 18

Content: This course will be centered around our close reading of Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception, though we will likely read additional texts by Merleau-Ponty and several other phenomenologists. Topics to be discussed include: the phenomenological method, the intentional structure of perception, the embodied character of perception and the interpersonal character of perception.

Text:

Merleau-Ponty, Phenomenology of Perception, 978-0415558693
Several additional texts may also be required

Particular: Assignments will likely include short explication papers, presentations, and a final term paper.

PHIL 570R - Ethics Seminar
Fotion, Tuesday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

PHIL 570R-000: Ethics Seminar
Fotion, Tuesday 2:00 – 5:00, Max: 18

Content: This seminar will canvass the major ethical (aka meta-ethical) theorists around today (or were around until recently) in the Anglo-American tradition.  These include intuitionists (Moore, Prichard and Ross), contractarians (Rawls and Scanlon, Kantians (Rawls and Korgaard), prescriptivist (Hare and Gibbard, language theorists (Hare and Habermas – how did he get in here?), virtue theorists (Hursthouse and Taylor, and naturalists (Boyd).  The emphasis in the seminar will be on contemporary writers rather than those of the recent past.  We will thus include in our reading writings by, for example, R. Dworkin and Parfet.

Text:

Darwall, Gibbard and Railton Moral Discourse and Practice, Oxford University Press, 1997, 9780195096699   

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 577R-000 - Philosophy of Social Science
Risjord, Wednesday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

Content: This course will focus on two themes concerning the ontology of the social world.  The first is about the possibility of some kind of reductionism: do states, political parties, corporations, or universities exist over and above the individuals who participate in them?  Do the social sciences need to appeal to such social entities in their explanations?  These large issues frame a number of more specific topics with which we will be concerned.  Reductionist (or individualist) approaches often rely on instrumental rationality as a form for action explanation, and decision theory and game theory have elaborated this idea in detail.  One of the issues about such explanations is whether individual intentionality can capture the phenomena of coordination and joint action.  Another concerns normativity: is individual rational action a sufficient basis for understanding the rules and norms of social life?  Answers to these questions have increasingly relied on the resources of evolutionary theory and cognitive psychology.  How do these interventions change the questions about social ontology?
The second theme concerns causality: what are the characteristics, scope, and limits of causal explanation of social phenomena?  Are there laws of the social world?  And are causal explanations appropriate at all?  Recent social science has turned to causal “mechanisms,” and this raises a number of ontological questions about the characteristics of such mechanisms.  The appeal to causality also raises epistemological questions about how causes are to be indentified, whether through correlations, case studies, or experiments. 

Text: Essays and book chapters will be available on electronic reserve.

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 599R: Directed Study
(Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 789-001 - Knowledge, Skepticism & Morality
Jackson, Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30 pm, Max:

PHIL 789-002 - (Re)Defining Mimesis (Same as CPLT 751-002, ENG 789, & ILA 790)
Branham and Johnston, Friday 12 - 3 pm, Max: 6

Content: This course will investigate the many shifts in meaning and function comprehended by the term mimesis from the ancient to the contemporary world. As formulated by Aristotle in opposition to Plato, mimesis functioned as a way of defining the relationship of art to the world (e.g., representation, expression, simulation) that is at the same time a way of defining the human, as when Aristotle calls "man" the "most mimetic animal." In the 20th century, with the advent of such technical media as film, gramophone, and typewriter and new ways of modeling the mind, mimesis can only assume a partial function within a larger assemblage, network, or psychic system of words, images and part-objects, as for example in Joyce's Ulysses and other modernist experiments. In the course of the century mimesis is repeatedly re-conceived as "the mimetic faculty" (Benjamin), "mimetic desire" and the violence of the sacred (Girard), forms of "economimesis" (Derrida), "memetics" (Dawkins) and the effect of "mirror neurons" (cognitive science), but in each manifestation assumes a different form of transmission and dynamic mode. More recently, in the large media assemblages that characterize the late 20th century, mimesis functions or is understood to operate in imaging, modeling, mimicry and certainly developmental learning, but always and alongside viral replications and strange becomings particularly evident in modern and contemporary art as well as in explosive political events.

In this seminar we will attempt to map or chart these and other shifts across a range of literary, philosophical and scientific discourses, ancient and modern, oral and written. The central question we will explore is how "the mimetic function" operates in significantly different terms, not only in modern and contemporary literature, but also in current models of the aesthetic, in anthropology, evolutionary theory, and cognitive science, and thus remains an inevitably fundamental concept.

Text: Selected readings by authors that will include: Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Petronius, Nietzsche, Bakhtin, W. J. Ong, S. Weil, E. Auerbach, James Joyce, F. Kittler, Freud, Lacan, W. Benjamin, Adorno, Girard, Derrida, Dawkins, Taussig, Deleuze, Baudrillard, Bolter and Grusin, and M.Arbib.

Particulars: two class presentations, and two short papers

PHIL 789-003 - Intersections: Democracy, Literature, Criticism
Bhaumik, Thursday 4 - 7 pm, Max

PHIL 789-004 - Postcolonial Theory (Same as CPLT 751 & ILA 790)
Meighoo, Thursday 1 - 4 pm, Max:

Content: Postcolonial theory is an interdisciplinary field of scholarly study that addresses the relations between race, ethnicity, culture, and power after the global decline of European colonialism over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  As its name suggests, postcolonial theory is indebted both to anticolonial thought and to poststructuralist theory.  Although some knowledge of either anticolonial thought or poststructuralist theory is recommended, it is not required for this course.

In this graduate seminar, we will read selected texts by some of the most prominent scholars associated with the emergence of postcolonial theory from the 1970s to the 1990s.  We may also draw from other works of literature, art, music, and film in critically reassessing the theoretical concepts of identity, difference, representation, subalternity, essentialism, and hybridity.

Text:

The assigned readings for this course will be provided by the following texts:

  • Edward W. Said, Orientalism;
  • Said, Culture and Imperialism;
  • Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, In Other Worlds: Essays in Cultural Politics;
  • Spivak, “Can the Subaltern Speak?” in Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture (ed. Cary Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg);
  • Homi K. Bhabha, The Location of Culture;
  • Stuart Hall, selections from Black British Cultural Studies: A Reader (ed. Houston A. Baker, Jr. et al);
  • Trinh T. Minh-ha, Woman, Native, Other;
  • V.Y. Mudimbe, The Invention of Africa: Gnosis, Philosophy, and the Order of Knowledge.

Assessment:

Student evaluations will be based on the following:

  • Five (5) response papers (3-4 pp. each, 40% total);
  • Long essay (15-20 pp., 40%);
  • Attendance and participation (20%).

PHIL 789-00P - Judith Butler: Perform/Ethics (Same as WGS 585)
Huffer, Thursday 1- 4 pm, Max:

PHIL 797R - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 799R-00P - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

Fall 2012 Courses

PHIL 500R - Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy: Aristotle
Jimenez, Wednesday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

Content: In this seminar we will discuss issues related to Aristotle’s psychology of cognition, epistemology and philosophy of mind, focusing on questions about criteria of demarcation and hierarchy between the different varieties of cognition.
We will start by exploring in detail Aristotle’s account of the powers of perception (aisthēsis), memory (mnēmē), imagination (phantasia) and experience (empeiria). The second part of the seminar will be devoted to a study of the five central intellectual virtues – craft (technē), demonstrative knowledge (epistēmē), thought (nous), practical knowledge (phronēsis) and wisdom (sophia).

We will take as main guides for our study the genetic accounts of knowledge from Metaphysics I.1 and Posterior Analytics II.19, and the varieties of knowledge outlined in Nicomachean Ethics VI (Eudemian Ethics V). Additional selections from these treatises will be thoroughly explored, as well as selected readings from De AnimaParva NaturaliaDe MotuHistory of Animals andPhysics. Contemporary discussions of all texts will be drawn upon to help with our analysis.

Texts:

  • Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation, 2 vols.

Required readings will be available for download through the course website.

Particulars: (1) seminar presentation; (2) weekly discussion comments/questions; (3) final paper.

PHIL 525R - Topics in Modern Philosophy: Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
Makkreel, Tuesday 6 - 9 pm, Max: 18

Content: An intensive study of Kantís Critique of Pure Reason which will trace Kantís transcendental approach as it applies to his analysis of the forms of intuition, the schemata of imagination, categories of understanding, and ideas of reason. The nature of synthetic a priori propositions will be examined in terms of mathematical cognition and scientific experience. Moving to his views on dialectics, we will explore Kantís critiques of rational psychology and speculative metaphysics. His transformation of theology will be related to his accounts of opinion, belief and knowledge.

Texts:

  • Kant, Critique of Pure Reason, trans. Guyer and Wood

Recommended:

  • Allison, Kant’s Transcendental Idealism

Particulars: Final grade will be based on student participation in the seminars and the completion of a 20-page paper.

PHIL 540R - 20th Century Philosophy Seminar: Heidegger and Holderlin (Same as CPLT 751)
Mitchell, Monday 6 - 9 pm, Max: 8

Content: Heidegger reads Hˆlderlin as a poet of promise. His work offers an alternative to the metaphysical tradition that culminates in Nietzscheís notion of the will to power. Where Nietzsche pronounces the death of God, Hˆlderlin proposes a flight of the gods and poetizes the consequences of this departure for the conduct of our lives. Across numerous lecture courses and essays, Heidegger grappled with the language and thought of Hˆlderlin, shaping his own thinking and understanding of our times in conversation with him.

In this course, we will read the poems, plays, essays, and letters of Hˆlderlin in conjunction with Heideggerís interpretations. The course begins with a consideration of the task of poetry as envisioned by both Hˆlderlin and Heidegger. We will then follow an itinerary through Hˆlderlinís work emphasizing the way in which his poetic thinking escapes a metaphysics of ìpresenceî in favor of a thinking of relation, whether with nature, the gods, the foreign, or our fellow human beings. Themes thus include: nature, art, poetry, the foreign and oneís own, return and recollection, the national, mortality, dwelling, and festival.

Texts:

  • Hölderlin, Hymns and Fragments. Ed. and trans. Sieburth
  • Hölderlin, Essays and Letters on Theory. Ed. and trans. Pfau
  • Hölderlin, Death of Empedocles: A Mourning Play. Ed. and trans. Krell
  • Heidegger, Elucidations of Hölderlin’s Poetry. Trans. Hoeller
  • Heidegger, Hölderlin’s Hymn “The Ister.” Trans. McNeill and Davis
  • Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought. Trans. Albert Hofstadter

Additional Heidegger translations will be provided in class:

  • Heidegger, Hölderlin’s Hymns “Germania” and “The Rhine,” trans. McNeill and Ireland
  • Heidegger, Hölderlin’s Hymn “Remembrance,” trans. McNeill and Ireland
  • Heidegger, “The Shining of Nature is a Higher Appearing.” Trans. Mitchell

Recommended:

  • Hölderlin, Poems and Fragments. 4th ed. Ed. and trans. Hamburger

Particulars: A screening of the film, The Ister (Barison and Ross, 2004) will also be arranged for the course.

PHIL 541R - Topics and Figures in 20th Century Philosophy: Hannah Arendt
McAfee, Thursday 1 - 4 pm, Max: 18

Content: Hannah Arendt was one of the most original and influential thinkers of the twentieth century. Deeply schooled in the history of politics and philosophy, she was a penetrating observer and critic of twentieth century culture, attitudes, and failings. But she also always held out hope that, even in dark times, people could create something new and illuminating.  This seminar will work through Hannah Arendt’s major concerns, from “the space of appearance” (the political) to the life of the mind (thinking, willing, judging).  We will also delve into some of the literature around her work that has been published in the past few decades to see how her work has been appropriated by philosophers with starkly different political orientations.

Texts:

  • Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism, new edition, Schocken Books, 2004
  • Arendt, The Human Condition
  • Arendt, On Revolution, revised second edition
  • Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem
  • Arendt, The Life of the Mind
  • Arendt, The Promise of Politics, edited and with an introduction by Jerome Kohn
  • Honig, ed. Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt

Recommended:

  • Arendt, Between Past and Future, revised edition
  • Arendt, Men in Dark Times
  • Arendt, Crises of the Republic
  • Arendt, Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy, edited and with an interpretive essay by Beiner
  • Arendt, Essays in Understanding: 1930–1954, edited and with an introduction by Kohn
  • Arendt, Responsibility and Judgment, edited and with an introduction by Kohn
  • Arendt, Hannah Arendt: The Recovery of the Public World, edited by Hill
  • Arendt, “Understanding and Politics.” Partisan Review, vol. 20, no. 4, reprinted in Essays in Understanding: 1930–1954
  • Arendt, “Personal Responsibility under Dictatorship.” The Listener, reprinted in Responsibility and Judgment
  • Arendt, “Thinking and Moral Considerations: A Lecture.” Social Research, vol. 38, no. 3, reprinted in Social Research, vol. 51, no. 1 (Spring 1984): 7–37, and in Responsibility and Judgment
  • Arendt, “Public Rights and Private Interests.” In M. Mooney and F. Stuber, eds., Small Comforts for Hard Times: Humanists on Public Policy

Secondary Literature:

  • Benhabib, The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt
  • Kristeva, Hannah Arendt: Life is a Narrative
  • Kristeva, Hannah Arendt, volume I of Female Genius: Life, Madness, Words—Hannah Arendt, Melanie Klein, Colette, a trilogy by Kristeva
  • Hill, ed., Hannah Arendt: The Recovery of the Public World
  • Pitkin, The Attack of the Blob: Hannah Arendt's Concept of the Social
  • Villa, Arendt and Heidegger: The Fate of the Political
  • Villa, Politics, Philosophy, Terror: Essays on the Thought of Hannah Arendt
  • Villa, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt
  • Wolin, “Hannah Arendt and the Ordinance of Time.” Social Research, 44/1
  • Young-Bruehl, Hannah Arendt: For Love of the World, second edition

Particulars: Final seminar paper. Also students will submit a one-page commentary in advance of each meeting of the seminar.

PHIL 556R - Phenomenology: Cassirer
Verene, Tuesday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

Content: Cassirerís philosophy of symbolic forms and the phenomenology of knowledge that underlies it is the key to an understanding of much of the modern phenomenological movement as well as a philosophy that stands on its own. The seminar will be a study of Cassirerís Philosophy of Symbolic Forms: vol. 3, The Phenomenology of Knowledge and vol. 4, The Metaphysics of Symbolic Forms. It will proceed to a reading of the short text of the famous debate between Cassirer and Heidegger at Davos and Cassirerís later, unpublished criticism of Heideggerís Dasein. Also, there will be consideration of Cassirerís response to Husserlís hyletic and noetic strata in terms of Cassirerís concept of ìsymbolic pregnanceî based on the ìlaw of pregnanceî of Gestalt psychology. Further consideration will be given to Merleau-Pontyís use of Cassirerís three functions of consciousness in chapter 3 of The Phenomenology of Perception as well as the connection between Cassirerís symbolic form of myth and Merleau-Pontyís ìwild beingî (líetre sauvage) in The Visible and Invisible.

Cassirer develops his philosophy of symbolic forms through a transposition of the classical conception of the human being as ananimal rationale into an animal symbolicum. The symbolic forms of myth and religion, language, art, history, and science are forms both of culture and of knowledge. These forms are generated through three functions of consciousness ñ expression, representation, and signification. Underlying these three functions are three ìbasis-phenomenaî that are not derivable from any other phenomena ñ the monadic I, action and will, and the work (Werk).

The fundamental question with which the seminar is concerned is: How are forms of cognition grounded in and derived from the non-cognitive in experience?

Texts:

  • Cassirer, Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, vol. 3, The Phenomenology of Knowledge
  • Cassirer, Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, vol. 4, The Metaphysics of Symbolic Forms, ed. Krois and Verene

Recommended:

  • Verene, The Origins of Symbolic Forms: Kant, Hegel, and Cassirer

Particulars: Final seminar paper and general departmental requirements.

PHIL 571R - Social and Political Philosophy Seminar: Democracy
Rogers, Monday 2 - 5 pm, Max: 18

Content: Democracy is a term that is often invoked. Yet there is little agreement on its meaning in modern times. This course examines several philosophical interpretations of democracy. In this course, we will mostly focus on the normative (that is, ideal standard or model) of democracy and will attempt to tease out its limitations and possibilities. As such, special attention will be given to the conceptual accounts of democracy offered by the various thinkers we read as well as the conflicts and tensions that are contained therein. Possible themes to be covered include: the meaning of democracyís intrinsic and instrumental worth, the role of deliberation and its relationship to persuasion, the epistemic and moral virtues needed to sustain democracy, the problems and possibilities of pluralism, the meaning of ìthe people,î and the role of dissent. Our investigation will be guided by several questions: What is the meaning of democracy? Is democracy the ideal form of political organization for human beings? Is democracy a set of procedures or is it a mode of existence or way of being-in-the-world? What is the relationship between democracy on the one hand, and freedom and equality on the other? Possible thinkers include: Seyla Benhabib, Robert Dahl, John Dewey, Nancy Fraser, Jurgen Habermas, Ian Shapiro, Tommie Shelby, Joseph Schumpeter, Jeff Stout, Mark Warren, Sheldon Wolin, Iris Marion Young.

Texts:

  • Balkin, Constitutional Redemption: Political Faith in an Unjust World
  • Benhabib (ed), Democracy and Difference
  • Canovan, The People
  • Darby, Rights, Race, and Recognition
  • Dewey, The Public and Its Problems
  • Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk
  • Holmes, Passions and Constraint
  • Morgan, Inventing the People
  • Rawls, Political Liberalism
  • Schmitt, The Concept of the Political
  • Schmitt, The Crisis of Parliamentary Democracy
  • Young, Inclusion and Democracy
  • Waldron, Law and Disagreement

Recommended (More Detail Included On Syllabus):

  • Sir Henry Maine, “The Nature of Democracy,” in Popular Government
  • Dewey, “The Ethics of Democracy”
  • Dewey, “Democracy: A Task Before Us”
  • Derrida, “Declarations of Independence”
  • Hazlitt, “What is the People?”
  • Przeworski, “Minimalist Conception of Democracy:  A Defense,” in Democracy’s Value
  • Frank, Constituent Moments: Enacting the People in Postrevolutionary America
  • Lippmann, Public Opinion
  • Lippmann, The Phantom Public
  • Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere
  • Rogers, “John Dewey and His Vision of Democracy”*
  • Bielefeldt, “Carl Schmitt’s Critique of Liberalism: Systematic Reconstruction and Countercriticism”*
  • Leydet, “Pluralism and the Crisis of Parliamentary Democracy”*
  • Mouffe, The Democratic Paradox
  • Rogers, “The Fact of Sacrifice and Necessity of Faith: Dewey and the Ethics of Democracy”
  • Crane, Race, Citizenship, and Law in American Literature, 1-56, 87-131
  • Levinson, Constitutional Faith
  • Michelman, “Faith and Obligation, or, What Makes Sandy Sweat?,” 38 Tulsa L. Rev. 651 2002-2003*
  • Glaude, “Tragedy and Moral Experience:  John Dewey and Toni Morrison’s Beloved,” in In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America
  • Ackerman, We The People: Foundations
  • Elster, “Deliberation and Constitution Making”
  • Rubenfeld, Freedom and Time: A Theory of Constitutional Self-Government
  • Bohman and Rehg (eds), Deliberative Democracy:  Essays on Reasons and Politics
  • Sanders, “Against Deliberation”
  • Shapiro, The State of Democratic Theory, chaps. 1-2
  • Cohen, “Procedure and Substance in Deliberative Democracy” in Democracy and Difference
  • McAfee, “Three Models of Democratic Deliberation,” Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18.1 (2004)
  • Stout, Democracy and Tradition, chaps. 9 & 10
  • Gooding-Williams, In the Shadow of Du Bois
  • Posnock, Color and Culture:  Black Writers and the Making of the Modern Intellectual, chap. 4
  • Tessman, Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles
  • Allen, Talking to Strangers
  • Chambers, “Rhetoric and the Public Sphere: Has Deliberative Democracy Abandon Mass Democracy?”*
  • Dryzek, “Rhetoric in Democracy:  A Systemic Appreciation”*
  • Garsten, Saving Persuasion, Intro-chap. 2, chaps. 4, 6
  • Kingston, Public Passion: Rethinking the Grounds for Political Justice
  • Wolin, Politics and Vision
  • Wolin, The Presence of the Past
  • Botwinick and Connolly (eds), Democracy and Vision
  • Rancière, “Ten Theses on Politics,” Theory and Event
  • Mouffe, On the Political

Particulars: Grades will be based on a research paper (20-25 page) due at the semester’s end (65%), a short (7-8 page) written response to one week’s reading (15%), a 10-15 minute oral discussion of another student’s written response (10%), and general seminar participation (10%).

PHIL 599R - Thesis Research (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 700 - Research Methods, Teaching Philosophy, and Professional
Development
Sullivan, Tuesday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm, Max: 12

Content: This seminar is intended for and required of all philosophy Ph.D. students in their first year of study at Emory University. The course seeks to provide students with an opportunity to: reflect on and develop academic research, analysis, interpretation, application, reading, and writing skills; plan a successful personal program of graduate study, professional placement, and professional advancement, and become able to draw on financial and other professional resources necessary for this; and critically consider philosophies of teaching and their implications for multiple aspects of successful teaching in the discipline of philosophy.

This course will function as a seminar. Students are expected to participate actively and fully in all class meetings.

Texts:

  • TBA

Particulars: Preparation for, attendance at, and active participation in every seminar meeting. Completion of several brief writing assignments.

PHIL 777 - Philosophy and Pedagogy
Sullivan, Thursday 11:30 am - 12:45 pm, Max: 10

Content: This is the departmentís TATTO course, and it aims to develop the teaching abilities of graduate students as they begin serving as teaching assistants, co-teachers, and then teachers. This course is required of and open only to second year graduate students in the department of philosophyís Ph.D. program.

Texts:

  • TBA

Particulars: Students are required to attend all class sessions, complete required reading and short writing assignments, and participate in teaching development activities.

PHIL 789R - Topics in Philosophy: Eros (Same as WGS 585)
Willett / Huffer, Wednesday 6 - 9 pm, Max: 9

Content: TBA

Texts:

  • TBA

Particulars: TBA

PHIL 797R - Directed Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10

PHIL 799R - Advanced Study (Permission Required)
Faculty, Max: 10